Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > Newbie Help

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Mar 19, 2010, 7:48 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 4
Default radio control race cars

i run a model car club what setting do i need to catch the action shots at speed on my panasonic lumix dmc-28 help needed please the pic i took below i am well pleased with any tips would be most helpfull
shortiepaul is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Mar 19, 2010, 9:19 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Widowmaker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Bakersfield, CA
Posts: 851
Default

I use to race... back in the day. Buggy 2wd, 4wd, stadium truck and oval track. When you say you want to catch the action, are you meaning stop it or have the motion blur of the wheels and background while keeping the car sharp?


If your wanting blur of background and wheels then try to get around 1/60 shutter speed and pan with the car. You can get away with a faster shutter speed but the higher you get, the faster the car will need to be. The wheels being so small are spinning fairly fast anyway so they will not be much issue. If you having trouble getting 1/60 or near it because of to much light be sure you are at your lowest ISO setting and stop down to reduce light... That will drop the shutter speed.

Last edited by Widowmaker; Mar 19, 2010 at 9:31 PM.
Widowmaker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 19, 2010, 10:27 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,572
Default

I'm not familiar with the Panasonic FZ28, but I suspect that the shutter lag and slow autofocus that's typical of P&S digicams would make what you want to do tough.
__________________
  • The lens is the thing.
  • 'Full Frame' is the new 'Medium Format'.
  • "One good test is worth a thousand expert opinions." - Tex Johnston, Boeing 707 test pilot.
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 22, 2010, 2:43 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Davenport, IA
Posts: 2,093
Default

Your EXIF data show ISO 100, f/5.6, 1/320 sec. Using aperture priority and setting f/8 would have dropped the shutter speed to 1/160 sec. That may be slow enough to blur the wheels a bit and with panning to motion blur the background a little.

A. C.
ac.smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 22, 2010, 8:16 PM   #5
Super Moderator
 
Mark1616's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 7,452
Default

Welcome to Steve's and a cool RC car photo!

For shooting the action, I would forget about using AF for tacking but rather prefocus on a point on the track where you want the action and then pan (using the slow shutter speed as already mentioned) taking a burst of shots at just before and after the focus point. Even though I have a high end dSLR and fast glass geared to sports use, this is the method that I used for jumping shots of off road RC cars. For jumping cars generally boosting the shutter speed helps too, if you are only shooting track then not such an issue.

So the key is to keep things constant with panning shots. Use shutter priority as shutter is your main element, if you use Av or any other mode (apart from M) then you will not have control over the shutter. If you are happy then it is even better to use full manual so you don't have the track or car colour affecting exposure.

Here are some samples..... as you can tell I've not shot RC cars for a while.





One good thing that you are showing in the shot you posted and it remains key for other shots is getting low. This brings you out of the normal perspective which is pretty boring and you enter the world of 1/10 or 1/8 depending on what you guys run (possibly even 1/5). The low angle gives a lot more impact, so couple that with some motion blur and good framing and you are going to create some winners.

Back to the pre focusing (yes I'm jumping around a bit but it's 2am and the brain has stopped), it is better to be on the inside of corners and then generally you have more options of the car being in focus as it goes around the corner. So set up, work that corner so you get a feel for the panning as the cars negotiate it, and as you hone your skills you will get more keepers. Then move to another location and shoot it. The worst thing you can do is case the cars all over the track, don't get distracted, just focus on your section.

You can also do long shots of the car coming down the track towards you. Again prefocus, but use a faster shutter speed as you will only be getting movement in the wheels anyway.

That should get you started. I'm looking forward to seeing how you get on.
Mark1616 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 23, 2010, 9:56 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Davenport, IA
Posts: 2,093
Default

Mark's advice is spot on for DSLRs but may require modification for your FZ28. Mark's DSLR has a burst frame rate of at least 5 frames/sec. Your FZ28 has a frame rate 2.5 frames/sec. While that may not seem like a big difference it is a complete world apart in usefulness. My experience with a slightly older super-zoom that has a 2 frames/sec. rate is that burst is a good way to to get 8 useless shots compared to 2 good ones without. The rate is just too slow. Granted this is based on my airshow experience not model cars but many of the issues are the same. Burst is definately a blessing with DSLRs but may not be very useful for P&S super-zooms, the exception being the CMOS sensored Canon and Sony super-zooms which have burst rates in the DSLR range. Try it but it may not increase your success rate.

Exposure again requires a bit different approach with a super-zoom vs. a DSLR. A DSLR lens stops down to f/22 which is a sufficent to get proper exposure with almost any rational shutter speed. The FZ28 is limited to f/8 so my my recommendation of using aperture priority at f/8 is simply that will yield the slowest shutter speed with correct exposure under his shooting conditions. Overcast would probably require open the aperture a bit.

Mark is right on with pre-focusing. Probably you can use the half shutter press technique focusing on the spot of ground that the car will pass over. Presetting focus and exposure will greatly reduce the shutter lag on any P&S. I also agree that inside a corner is better than outside the corner. This isn't from models but full size cars. Once you get a low enough perspective your dealing with the same issues.

A. C.

Last edited by ac.smith; Mar 23, 2010 at 9:58 AM.
ac.smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 23, 2010, 10:59 AM   #7
Super Moderator
 
Mark1616's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 7,452
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ac.smith View Post
Mark's advice is spot on for DSLRs but may require modification for your FZ28. Mark's DSLR has a burst frame rate of at least 5 frames/sec. Your FZ28 has a frame rate 2.5 frames/sec. While that may not seem like a big difference it is a complete world apart in usefulness. My experience with a slightly older super-zoom that has a 2 frames/sec. rate is that burst is a good way to to get 8 useless shots compared to 2 good ones without. The rate is just too slow. Granted this is based on my airshow experience not model cars but many of the issues are the same. Burst is definately a blessing with DSLRs but may not be very useful for P&S super-zooms, the exception being the CMOS sensored Canon and Sony super-zooms which have burst rates in the DSLR range. Try it but it may not increase your success rate.

Exposure again requires a bit different approach with a super-zoom vs. a DSLR. A DSLR lens stops down to f/22 which is a sufficent to get proper exposure with almost any rational shutter speed. The FZ28 is limited to f/8 so my my recommendation of using aperture priority at f/8 is simply that will yield the slowest shutter speed with correct exposure under his shooting conditions. Overcast would probably require open the aperture a bit.

Mark is right on with pre-focusing. Probably you can use the half shutter press technique focusing on the spot of ground that the car will pass over. Presetting focus and exposure will greatly reduce the shutter lag on any P&S. I also agree that inside a corner is better than outside the corner. This isn't from models but full size cars. Once you get a low enough perspective your dealing with the same issues.

A. C.
I would still use continuous drive shooting even if it is slow, with 2 or 3 shots per car as it rounds a corner you have a better chance of one being sharp than if you only take one.

With the aperture it's a good point, I really didn't think of that with the limits on a P&S so you are right in regards to that if there is too much light. It might be worth getting a ND filter if shutter speeds are still too fast.
Mark1616 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 24, 2010, 10:11 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Davenport, IA
Posts: 2,093
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark1616 View Post
I would still use continuous drive shooting even if it is slow, with 2 or 3 shots per car as it rounds a corner you have a better chance of one being sharp than if you only take one.

With the aperture it's a good point, I really didn't think of that with the limits on a P&S so you are right in regards to that if there is too much light. It might be worth getting a ND filter if shutter speeds are still too fast.
Yes, the OP should try the burst mode. My comments on burst mode with P&Ss are based solely on my results at the at the last airshow I attended, not RC models, and I found my composition/framing accuracy was much worse with burst mode compared to manually firing the shutter. I think I found it more difficult to maintain a smooth pan during EVF blackout when I really didn't know when the blackout would occur. Manually firing the shutter allowed me to anticipate the blackout and maintain the pan. This could be a "Your mileage may vary" situation.

I hadn't considered ND filters but that could really enhance the photogs flexibility. Besides allowing slower shutter speed it would throw the background at least a little more out of focus.

A. C.
ac.smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 24, 2010, 11:26 AM   #9
Super Moderator
 
Mark1616's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 7,452
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ac.smith View Post
I hadn't considered ND filters but that could really enhance the photogs flexibility. Besides allowing slower shutter speed it would throw the background at least a little more out of focus.

A. C.
Probably getting the background OOF with a small sensor camera isn't going to be easy and actually it is going to be better if the OP shoots at narrower apertures (assuming that the shutter is slow enough to get motion blur) as this will ensure a wider area is in focus when trying to get the car sharp and the blur will negate the need for shallow DOF.

I agree if zoomed in and going for less motion blur getting the DOF more shallow will help, but again, it is hard without using a dSLR.
Mark1616 is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:42 PM.