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Old Apr 2, 2010, 3:50 PM   #1
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Default T2i Settings

So I've been using the camera day in day out and researching all over, I have a question about some settings. Let me just start off with the one that I've been wondering about.

Picture Styles - I've been shooting in full manual a lot, as well as Av when I'm shooting sports, I have yet to change this from the default "Standard" setting, here is the question, is this sufficient, rather, do you create your own custom setting and adjust the individual parameters yourself? i.e. the standard default is set as such:

sharpness 3
contrast 0
saturation 0
color tone 0

the range is -7 to 7 I believe.
With sports shooting as the first priority are these settings sufficient? If I boosted the sharpness would it be introducing noise? I'm I a rookie for not boosting sharpness up in the first place, have I been missing out on some sharp photos? I suppose questions for contrast/saturation.

Thanks,
Mike
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Old Apr 2, 2010, 5:40 PM   #2
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I'd leave it alone unless I weren't happy with the results I got.
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Old Apr 2, 2010, 10:16 PM   #3
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I'm not a fan of in-camera sharpening. It's easy to add sharpening with software, almost impossible to repair over-sharpening done in-camera. I feel similarly about the other settings, but other people like a more "punchy" look to their pictures right out of the camera and may choose to adjust contrast or saturation.

P.S. Best thing to do rather than ask advice from people with different tastes, is to take a series of photos and play with the settings yourself. It's just digital, so take a whole series and see what the settings do for yourself. Look at them on the monitor and then decide if you want to change anything off of the default settings or not, then delete the rest. There's no cost to doing that and you'll learn quite a bit about what your camera is capable of doing, as well as matching it to YOUR tastes.

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Old Apr 2, 2010, 10:34 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtngal View Post
I'm not a fan of in-camera sharpening. It's easy to add sharpening with software, almost impossible to repair over-sharpening done in-camera. I feel similarly about the other settings, but other people like a more "punchy" look to their pictures right out of the camera and may choose to adjust contrast or saturation.

P.S. Best thing to do rather than ask advice from people with different tastes, is to take a series of photos and play with the settings yourself. It's just digital, so take a whole series and see what the settings do for yourself. Look at them on the monitor and then decide if you want to change anything off of the default settings or not, then delete the rest. There's no cost to doing that and you'll learn quite a bit about what your camera is capable of doing, as well as matching it to YOUR tastes.
I did this exact thing right after I hit "post", kind of felt like a knuckle head for posting it after I realized it's what I should have done in the first place. With that said, I still wanted to know from the experienced if there was something to note... thanks for the replies all.
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Old Apr 2, 2010, 11:09 PM   #5
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Asking questions is always a great idea, especially when you've gotten yourself so confused you aren't sure which way is up. And the sharpening thing is something I feel quite strongly about - when you get a dSLR you are also making a commitment to learn something about processing the files. Luckily, you don't have to become a Photoshop expert or anything to become competent. I do more than many do, partly because I enjoy it and partly because I like having the creative control. But it's easy to lose perspective on things.

After you play around with your settings, post what conclusion worked best for you - I'd be interested in what you think of the T2i's sharpening. Perhaps cameras are better about it now than they were a couple of years ago.
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Old Apr 2, 2010, 11:23 PM   #6
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I would set the presets to the factory setting, there are 3 user define ones. I would try different sharpness, color tone, saturation, and contrast.
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Old Apr 3, 2010, 6:14 AM   #7
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Personally I use the standard settings from the manufacturer apart from sharpness which I turn down as it will increase noise and also I like to sharpen as the very last part of my processing.
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Old Apr 12, 2010, 12:28 AM   #8
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I do not really think upping the sharpness will increase noise that badly. I took some of these shots at 1600 and 3200iso with sharpness set to max.
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Old Apr 12, 2010, 12:36 AM   #9
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Here are the crop in to show the noise
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Old Apr 12, 2010, 12:49 AM   #10
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This is at 100iso and crop in.
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