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Old Apr 26, 2010, 1:26 PM   #1
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Default Really basic question (I think!)

Hi there! I am new to the forums and have a Canon Rebel xsi. I have had it for about a year and only used it in Auto mode. I just recently started to try and learn Manual modes. This weekend was my first try at AV mode and I was trying to take a picture of a flower. I have the David Busch book that is for my model, as well as a For Dummies. I have yet to read them cover to cover though and couldn't find my answer on a quick search. Here is my question and I am sorry if it is so basic that I get a lot of eye rolls LOL. But I couldn't find it in any of my books.

When I press down on the shutter button after making my setting selections and focusing, it closes the shutter and everything is black. Then it doesn't take the picture until I press the shutter button again. Is this right? I was not using a tripod so it seems like that would allow for movement of my hand while I am waiting to press the button again. Please help me understand the reason for this. Thanks!
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Old Apr 26, 2010, 1:38 PM   #2
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That means you enabled Mirror Lockup in your Custom Functions menus to help prevent vibration from Mirror Slap when using slower shutter speeds with a longer focal length lens with your camera on a tripod.

The viewfinder is blocked because it flips up the Mirror with the first shutter depression and takes the photo when it sees another one. That feature is not designed to allow for normal shooting unless you're doing the framing using a tripod mounted camera and using a remote shutter release to take the photo after you've already framed everything as desired. You can enable it or disable it (and the camera defaults with that feature disabled) via Custom Function 9. I'd disable it to prevent your problem.

See page 157 of the manual:

http://gdlp01.c-wss.com/gds/3/030000...EOS450D_EN.pdf
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Old Apr 26, 2010, 1:45 PM   #3
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Default Thank you!

I did enable that after reading Digital Photography by Scott Kelby on Saturday. He said it would make all of my photos better Guess I was getting way ahead of myself and my knowledge base. Thank you for helping me! I don't think I would EVER have figured that out on my own and would have become so frustrated and likely given up on trying anything other than basic Auto functions. Thanks again!

Is there a link to recommended books for basic learners like me? I do best with book learning or websites. Thanks!
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Old Apr 26, 2010, 1:57 PM   #4
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Well... If you're taking photos at longer focal lengths, Mirror Lockup can be useful with some cameras (because vibration from camera movement or mirror slap is magnified as focal lengths get longer).

There is usually a relatively narrow range of shutter speeds impacted at a given focal length. For example, you may see a bit of blur from mirror slap at 1/15 second with some lenses, but not at 1/30 second, or not at 1 second (because the vibration induced is a smaller percentage of the exposure at slower shutter speeds, and it not enough to impact blur at faster shutter speeds). How much vibration is induced also comes into the equation (as some cameras have mirror mechanisms that produce more vibration compared to others). Ditto for how stable your tripod is (which can have a big impact).

But, you do not want to use that feature unless you are using a tripod mounted camera (otherwise, you can't see to compose your images).

As for learning, Canon has some tutorials online that you may want to look at that could be helpful, covering a wide variety of topics:

http://www.usa.canon.com/dlc/control...&articleID=278

But, any good book on basic photography should also help out (covering exposure, composition, etc.), as the same techniques apply to both film and digital cameras. So, you may want to check your local library to see what they have.
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Old Apr 26, 2010, 2:16 PM   #5
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P.S.

Welcome to the Forums.

BTW, you may also want to browse through the Knowledge Center here at Steve's, where you'll find lots of articles on a variety of photography related subjects.

http://www.steves-digicams.com/knowledge-center/
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Old May 7, 2010, 4:53 AM   #6
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Nice tips, can your guys give me some comments on this specified model! http://www.tradestead.com/wholesale-...x-_p10754.html
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Old May 7, 2010, 5:03 AM   #7
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Nice tips, can your guys give me some comments on this specified model! http://www.tradestead.com/wholesale-...x-_p10754.html
Have you seen Stave's Review? http://www.steves-digicams.com/camer...sony/dsc-w330/
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