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Old Apr 28, 2010, 9:01 PM   #1
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Default Not sure how to word this........

Let me start by saying that I know NOTHING about photography, cameras, photo editing, photoshop........My wife would be the first one to tell you that when I get into something new, I tend to Jump in with both feet. Now, I dont have alot of money to go to any fancy school or anything like that, but what is the best way (other then reading all the fine posts on here) to learn all this stuff? Is it better to look for books, or are there some cheap online courses that I could take. Thanks for any help you can give me.
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Old Apr 28, 2010, 9:04 PM   #2
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Steve's knowledge center has allot of info. If you want to get into DSLR shooting. www.dslrtips.com has some youtube video work shops. Also there are couple of good books on the market on understanding exposure. Getting that right will greatly improve you shooting.
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Old Apr 28, 2010, 9:04 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by BigDaddy12t View Post
Let me start by saying that I know NOTHING about photography, cameras, photo editing, photoshop........My wife would be the first one to tell you that when I get into something new, I tend to Jump in with both feet. Now, I dont have alot of money to go to any fancy school or anything like that, but what is the best way (other then reading all the fine posts on here) to learn all this stuff? Is it better to look for books, or are there some cheap online courses that I could take. Thanks for any help you can give me.
"The Digital Photography Book" - Vols 1-3 - by Scott Kelby
"Understanding Exposure" by Bryan Peterson

Although I don't know what kind of camera(s) you have, these two will help immensely.
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Old Apr 28, 2010, 9:22 PM   #4
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Thanks! I am going back and forth between the Fuji HS-10, and the Panasonic FZ-35.
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Old Apr 28, 2010, 9:24 PM   #5
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Thanks! I am going back and forth between the Fuji HS-10, and the Panasonic FZ-35.
Only you can make that choice. Good luck.
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Old Apr 29, 2010, 9:12 AM   #6
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"The Digital Photography Book" - Vols 1-3 - by Scott Kelby
"Understanding Exposure" by Bryan Peterson
...
A word of caution on Scott Kelby's material. Read all of it, don't skim because some of what he says, taken out of context I think, can mislead more than illuminate based on what I've read here in several recent threads. Apparently he recommends f/11 as a starting point for portraits and night shots and some readers have taken that as an absolute, a sort of magic number. I suspect in full context that is just a start point and is based on a full frame DSLR. It would first need to be adjusted for sensor size, one stop for APS-C and two stops for 4:3. P&S cameras don't even have f/11. In another thread the OP took the recommendation to use mirror lockup (I'm sure that was in reference to tripod use) as an always recommendation. Needless to say using that function hand-held created issues for the OP.

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Old Apr 29, 2010, 9:48 AM   #7
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A word of caution on Scott Kelby's material. Read all of it, don't skim because some of what he says, taken out of context I think, can mislead more than illuminate based on what I've read here in several recent threads. Apparently he recommends f/11 as a starting point for portraits and night shots and some readers have taken that as an absolute, a sort of magic number. I suspect in full context that is just a start point and is based on a full frame DSLR. It would first need to be adjusted for sensor size, one stop for APS-C and two stops for 4:3. P&S cameras don't even have f/11. In another thread the OP took the recommendation to use mirror lockup (I'm sure that was in reference to tripod use) as an always recommendation. Needless to say using that function hand-held created issues for the OP.

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WOW! Talk about over my head! I am starting to wonde if I am in over my head.
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Old Apr 29, 2010, 12:15 PM   #8
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BigDaddy-

Why not look at what courses in photography your local Community College is offering for the Summer Quarter.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Apr 29, 2010, 12:20 PM   #9
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Thanks Sarah, I will look into that.
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Old Apr 29, 2010, 12:35 PM   #10
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Many digicam vendors have on-line tutorials for their products that may provide you with a foundation for your future knowledge and experience. Canon has the Learning Station. Nikon has the Nikon School & Workshops. (Sony used to have some great on-line tutorials, but they're off-line right now.) Take a look at some of these, and if anything goes over your head, Wikipedia is a great source of info on any concept or topic.

Play with the available resources that are already out there.
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