Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > Newbie Help

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old May 4, 2010, 12:50 PM   #11
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 5
Default

Thanks raiderfan, so there is no deal that lets you exchange the camera later on by paying the difference? It looked like it might have been something the camera stores might offer sort of like extended warranty deals, etc.

Thanks again.
vvincent is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 4, 2010, 2:47 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
frank-in-toronto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Toronto Canada
Posts: 1,083
Default Higher Class is Better

Quote:
Originally Posted by vvincent View Post
@frank-in-toronto, the classes you mention, which is better? Are they like versions, so class 10 is better?...
The card just needs to be faster than the camera. Since that's a bit of an unknown, and since card prices are low enough and for future usage, I'd suggest buying class 6 or 10. 6 is plenty for most cameras. When I saw that 10 only cost a couple of dollars more, I went that way. No reason not to.
Incidently, the number refers to the minimum write speed.
frank-in-toronto is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 4, 2010, 6:10 PM   #13
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 5
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by frank-in-toronto View Post
The card just needs to be faster than the camera. Since that's a bit of an unknown, and since card prices are low enough and for future usage, I'd suggest buying class 6 or 10. 6 is plenty for most cameras. When I saw that 10 only cost a couple of dollars more, I went that way. No reason not to.
Incidently, the number refers to the minimum write speed.
Thanks frank-in-toronto, Will do and also learnt something new.
vvincent is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 9, 2010, 5:46 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
RioRico's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: In mountainous California or Arizona or Guatemala or somewhere.
Posts: 224
Default

Basics: more than one memory card. More than one battery. A bag you're comfortable with (I use an Ameribag for cameras, lenses, filters, mini-laptop, etc). Maybe a STURDY tripod. Beyond that... ah yes, filters.

I don't use filters to protect lenses, unless I'll be shooting in blowing sand, churning mud, etc. Useful filters: neutral desnsity, to control light. Graduated neutral density, to shoot a dark foreground with a bright background, etc. Polarizer, to cut reflections.

Then there are color effect filters, but don't worry about these until you're ready to KICK ASS on the EMF spectrum. I shoot infrared sometimes, so I use IR-pass filters. I use violet-blue filters to replicate the sensitivity of early B&W emulsions. I use a yellow filter to get color effects when shooting glaring neon lights. I use other colored filters just for the hell of it. Don't buy any of these now (unless they're REAL cheap); but keep in mind, as you learn photography, that light can be tortured in many ways.

What else? Read books. Memorize your camera's manual. Read about how exposure works. Read about light, composition, technique. Go to a public library and read all they have, old and new, about the craft of photography. Look; see; think; shoot; learn. And keep shooting. Shooting is free. You have a fine new tool -- master it. Have fun!
RioRico is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 3:56 AM.