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Old May 22, 2010, 11:29 PM   #1
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Default is dslr's video better than compact's?

hello everyone, this is my first post here ...

I am considering buying a new camera and I love to capture some good clips with it (I don't want a camcorder, i think a camera is good enough) ... Ive done some researchs and found out that a dslr's iq is superior than a compact's so if you want a good camera, its dslr all the way ,right ? ...but like I said , I want to make movies with my camera too .a dslr with video is too expensive for me so I'll sacrifice IQ and go for a compact .What i am wondering is is dslr's video quality better than compact's like the IQ ?

btw, sorry about my bad english , hope you understand
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Old May 22, 2010, 11:38 PM   #2
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Some dslr can shoot at Full HD, so you get 1080P, but recently some compact point and shoots are coming out with 1080P also. But form what I have seen, the higher quality lenses of a DSLR system gives the DSLR a edge in image quality. Seems like canon has produce some really good dslr with full HD, that they are using them to film music videos and TV programs now.

But if you are just looking for youtube HD, a compact point and shoot will do a nice job, and a lot less cost.
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Old May 23, 2010, 4:01 AM   #3
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Welcome to Steve's. The simple answer is yes the quality is generally quite a bit better with a dSLR, however the ease of use it much much better with a compact.

As a middle ground there are cameras like the Olympus EPL1 do well as they have much better AF than a dSLR when shooting video. If video is high on your list and you don't want to work with manual focus for a lot of it then go compact or EPL1 route.
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Old May 23, 2010, 7:25 AM   #4
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I agree with my colleagues. A dSLR is capable of superior video, but it will take a lot more effort on your part to get it. dSLRs generally can't automatically change the exposure settings while recording a video, so if the lighting changes, the scene will end up either underexposed or overexposed. Also generally, dSLRs can't change the focus while recording a video, and those that can are slow to do so. In addition, camcorders have much greater zoom ratios than dSLR lenses, giving you greater flexibility, and the dSLR lenses that do have significant zoom ratios, and so may be good for recording videos, aren't very good for shooting still images.

The primary reason to go with a dSLR over a P&S is that you don't have to compromise when shooting still images. Using a dSLR to shoot video is the antithesis of not compromising, and unless you're willing to put forth the extra effort to get the excellent video that dSLRs are capable of, I think you'd be happier with a camcorder or a P&S.
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Old May 27, 2010, 5:20 AM   #5
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But the settings for video in a DSLR are automatically derived by the camera? And just the focus is usually done manually?

So basically a DSLR would be better for small clips in order not to change the lighting in a scene? Rather if you shoot inside a house, and then go outside at the garden it wouldnt change its settings?

Thanks
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Old May 27, 2010, 7:52 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TCav View Post
...dSLRs generally can't automatically change the exposure settings while recording a video, so if the lighting changes, the scene will end up either underexposed or overexposed.
Current Nikon and Canon dSLR models with video recording ability vary the exposure in changing lighting while recording movies by varying sensor gain (i.e., ISO speed) versus aperture.
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Old May 27, 2010, 8:40 AM   #7
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ok, thinking of buying a Pentax k-x, and i had in my options also Fz38...

Do you know if Pentax has auto modes in video? In order to change exposure etc? I know definitely that it doesnt have auto focus...
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Old May 27, 2010, 8:46 AM   #8
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Like most other dSLR models with movie recording, the Pentax varies the exposure by varying sensor gain versus aperture. The Focus and Aperture are locked at the start of a recording with the K-x (they won't change while shooting a movie clip).
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Old May 27, 2010, 8:58 AM   #9
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ok thanks, so in simple words for me that i am just starting to learn these things :
- it auto adjust ssettings at the beginning of recording and
- does not change them during filming?
or you mean
- if you want to manually adjust settings you would need to stop filming and then adjsut settings?
- but otherwise the camera adjusts automatically the settings?

Sorry but i dont understand so much yet of the photography terms...
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Old May 27, 2010, 9:11 AM   #10
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I don't have a DSLR that does video, but can't imagine why you couldn't manually adjust aperture and focus during filming. The downside, (and probably the reason it is done this way) is that the aperture click stops would be introduced to the audio (with the mike on the camera), and any focus adjustments could look odd if made during filming.

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