Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > Newbie Help

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jul 7, 2010, 7:03 PM   #1
LEK
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 112
Default Question about Jpeg/Lossy

Hello again. I know that with the Jpeg format that each time you do something with the photo, such as edit it, that you lose a bit of quality. What I'd like to know is, does this apply to such things as downloading and copying files? In other words, if I am going to make an 8 x 10 print, does it matter if I have the photo shop take this from the camera's memory card vs sending them downloaded files from my computer, or a flash drive, CD, etc?
Getting ready to vacation in Colorado for a week with my wonderful ZS3. Can't wait and hope to get some good photos but want to print them with least loss of quality. Thanks!
LEK is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jul 7, 2010, 7:30 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
frank-in-toronto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Toronto Canada
Posts: 1,083
Default

No. The compression and therefore loss, occurs when it is saved. copying the file doesn't change anything. some email clients resize on send. just make sure if you email, you get what you expect. and if you are printing using an online service, then resize to the required target resolution on your own computer so they won't.

You probably are well aware, but important vacation pics should be saved in 2 places for safety. so when you get back to your hotel room, just copy the new pics to your computer. leave them on the card as is and you're backed up.

as an aside, don't forget to get a snap of "where the fifteenth step is engraved with the words "One Mile Above Sea Level" "
frank-in-toronto is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 8, 2010, 3:56 PM   #3
LEK
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 112
Default

Thanks for the input. I'm not sure about the resizing, this is a photo store that usually prints my pictures and they have an on-line feature on their website, I send them on-line, they print the photos at the store and I pick them up there. I think it will probably be fine, but I'll remember that lossy occurs every time I save.
Regarding your tip on downloading to laptop while traveling, I am one of the few people nowadays who doesn't take their laptop while travelling, I generally want to be disconnected. I just have the photos in the camera memorycard until I get home, then the first thing I do is download to computer and a flashdrive. Not a bad idea to take the laptop on longer trips though, if only for photos. We're taking a 2 week trip to Alaska next year, will definitely take the laptop for those photos!
I don't know the reference to the 15th step, is that in Denver? We're flying into Denver, but that's it, spending our time in Aspen, Vail, Summit County and Rocky Mountain NP.
Thanks again for the response.
LEK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 8, 2010, 5:58 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
frank-in-toronto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Toronto Canada
Posts: 1,083
Default A Couple of Thoughts

Quote:
Originally Posted by LEK View Post
1. this is a photo store that usually prints my pictures and they have an on-line feature on their website, I send them on-line, they print the photos at the store and I pick them up there

2. I just have the photos in the camera memorycard until I get home, then the first thing I do is download to computer and a flashdrive.

3.I don't know the reference to the 15th step, is that in Denver?
1. i think they'll be ok too. the store photo-lab will resize and crop to fit the output paper size. if it's what you want, go for it. If you've been satisfied so far, might as well continue. An interesting test would be to take a picture of a sheet of graph paper with a numbered grid and get it printed. see how they change things.

2. one day you will lose all your pics. if you're ok with that, fine. i bought a netbook to bring around for this reason. also i use it to manage my ipod touch libraries. nothing to do with being online necessarily.

3. just an idea of a photo that i've never seen. "The Mile High Marker is a popular tourist attraction - thousands of people pose for photographs there each year."

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/m.../ai_n10025845/
frank-in-toronto is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 8, 2010, 6:15 PM   #5
LEK
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 112
Default

"One day you will lose all your photos"

Grim words, I would hate that. Is that because it's inevitable that a memory card will fail? What else would cause me to lose all my photos on a trip? I replace my memory cards before they are overused, bring extras and don't mess with deleting or editing in camera, I just take pictures and review them until they are safely downloaded when I get home. I don't have a carrying case for my laptop but I'll start looking into getting one, maybe not for Colorado but certainly for Alaska.
LEK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 8, 2010, 6:44 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
frank-in-toronto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Toronto Canada
Posts: 1,083
Default Better Ask Murphy

Quote:
Originally Posted by LEK View Post
"One day you will lose all your photos"...Is that because it's inevitable that a memory card will fail? ..
Because things fail and we all make mistakes. sometimes. i hope you never lose a pic, but it happens. an on-site backup will prevent loss except in extreme cases. then you'll wish you had ftp'd some of the most critical pics somewhere else.

in the end, we do what we do. usually it's enough. if i weren't backing up my pics, i would change the memory card daily and store it safely. that way the most i could expect to lose is 1 day's worth. writing a number on your card makes this easy to organize.
frank-in-toronto is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 8, 2010, 6:48 PM   #7
LEK
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 112
Default

Thanks, I have worried about that in the past, I treat the camera like it's gold once it gets some great shots in there, it's such a relief to download them and know they are safe. Bringing the laptop is a good idea. One more question what is ftp? quote: "then you'll wish you had ftp'd some of the most critical pics"
LEK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 8, 2010, 8:00 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
frank-in-toronto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Toronto Canada
Posts: 1,083
Default ftp term

Quote:
Originally Posted by LEK View Post
...One more question what is ftp? quote: "then you'll wish you had ftp'd some of the most critical pics"
I use "ftp" as a generic term for online storage. FTP itself is the name of the protocol used to transfer files. Some (me) still use it. Others use web based services. Either way, the idea is to get your important files somewhere else.

you could get a gmail/yahoo/live account and email them to yourself. you could set up a server on your home machine and send them there (this would be a lot more work than most folk want to do).

I'm content just to get them onto a hard drive. If I'm really nervous or if they are really important, I also copy them to a USB stick. If this was a once in a lifetime trip/event, I would take further precautions. I usually take 2 cameras and take pictures with both. That way if one camera turns out to not be working properly, it's not a total loss.

Altho it may seem that I'm building this up, once you get set up with spare memory cards, spare USB sticks and a small net/notebook, it's easy and fun. Sometimes I burn a dvd and we all watch the day's pictures.
frank-in-toronto is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 8, 2010, 10:47 PM   #9
LEK
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 112
Default

I just realized my IPod has photo storage capacity. I'm still trying to figure out it's storage capacity and I need a camera connector but if it's not too much $ I think I may get one for this trip, it's alot easier to carry around an IPOD than a 17 inch laptop. I also looked into the portable photo storage units you can buy, I'll likely get one of those for Alaska next year. Thanks for getting me started in this direction, it's a good idea to have back-up.
LEK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 9, 2010, 7:29 AM   #10
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by frank-in-toronto View Post
I use "ftp" as a generic term for online storage. FTP itself is the name of the protocol used to transfer files. Some (me) still use it. Others use web based services. Either way, the idea is to get your important files somewhere else.

you could get a gmail/yahoo/live account and email them to yourself.
One problem is that most e-mail services have limits on the size you can use for attachments. For example, gmail.com has a 25MB per message limit:

http://mail.google.com/support/bin/a...en&answer=6584

Quote:
you could set up a server on your home machine and send them there (this would be a lot more work than most folk want to do).
One easy way to do it is use http://www.dropbox.com (free for up to 2GB).

Basically, you install their software on all of your PCs and you'll have a dropbox folder added under your file manager (Windows Explorer, etc.). Then, all you have to do is copy and paste files into subfolders under dropbox, and it will automatically copy them to the dropbox file servers in the background, and down to the dropbox folders on any other PCs you have installed with the same account (and you can even shut down and it will restart where it left off later when you're connected again).

That lets you sync files between all of your PCs and laptops (so that the same files show up on more than one machine, in addition to being stored in your dropbox folders on their servers). It's cross platform with software for Windows, Linux, Mac; and even some mobile phones now (with mobile versions available for iPad, iPod and Android). It works behind routers and firewalls without needing to enable port forwarding like you would need to do with your own ftp server. They also have a web based interface you can use. I have it installed on a couple of my PCs now. It's free for up to 2GB of storage, and they have pay plans for more. You can also get a "Public URL" for items in your dropbox public (versus private) folders, so that you can give links to others to download files, without them needing to install any software (they'd just click on the link and use their internet browser to download files instead).

Another way to easily transfer files from one PC to another without worrying about setting up a server and configuring port forwarding in your home router is using TeamViewer (free for personal use). I've got it installed on some of my machines now.

http://www.teamviewer.com/index.aspx

You just install their software on your PCs, and you can use one to remote control another one, and it will work behind most routers and firewalls without needing to enable port forwarding. It allows for file transfers between the PCs connected (in either direction). You can make a file transfer only connection, or you can initiate file transfers from within a remote control session. Basically, it establishes and authenticates the connection via their servers, then you run peer to peer (so throughput is very good). It's available for Linux, Windows and Mac users, and it's free for personal use (and you can do things like transfer files between, and remote control a Windows PC from Linux and vice-versa).
JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 1:26 PM.