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Old Sep 23, 2010, 12:29 PM   #1
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Default Introductory photography books/tutorials

I bought a Pentax Kx awhile back after some good advice from many of you on this board. I hate to admit it, but I am not using it to it's ability.

I need a good introduction on how to use a DSLR for taking simple family photos. Landscape and wildlife is a future possibility, but not a big deal - I primarily want to take photos of the little ones at birthday parties and not have them look like a blurry image (currently using the sport setting).
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Old Sep 23, 2010, 12:48 PM   #2
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For books, your best bet is your local library. Don't worry if the book refers to chemical cameras - f/stops, exposure, framing, ... are all the same. Processing is the only major difference between using chemical or electronic cameras.
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Old Sep 23, 2010, 1:13 PM   #3
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There are lots of on-line sites that are good. My favorite general-purpose tutorials site is: http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials.htm For a lot of good short articles on composition, I like: http://photoinf.com/

FWIW
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Old Sep 23, 2010, 1:58 PM   #4
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Manuel manuel manuel, read it twice so this will prevent so to ask simple question and you wouldn't feel bad.
Secondly there could be camera related books around there. Please look at this link.
Then read the understanding exposure which is from bryn peterson and if you have anything to ask, ask it in this forum.
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Old Sep 25, 2010, 8:21 AM   #5
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I'm waiting for my latest "Dummies" book to arrive on my camera. Over the years I have found both the "Dummies and Idiots" guide books are invaluable. Written by down to earth authors who have written their books from a laymans perspective in "my kind of language"
While searching for the "Nikon D5000 For Dummies" I also saw other makes and models of DSLR cameras for Dummies books, check them out!!
I also found Digital Photography For Dummies, next book on my list!!
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Old Sep 25, 2010, 5:47 PM   #6
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I agree that the first place to start is the camera manual. It will likely have general information on exposure, DOF, and using fill flash, as well as info specific to your camera. A thorough reading, a couple times through, and using it as a reference while you are learning, can make a big difference in your pictures sooner than most other references.

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Old Sep 25, 2010, 6:26 PM   #7
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Look at local resources: a Community College course in digital cameras? Or, join a local camera club where you can do side by side shooting with some very experienced photographers, who would be willing to provide some one on one help. Even working as a Wedding Photographer's volunteer assistant can provide a good learning opportunity,

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Old Sep 26, 2010, 3:46 AM   #8
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I think the camera manual is a terrible place to start learning photography.

Understanding exposure is a good starting point. Local courses can be very valuable too.

The manual only tells you how, not why.
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Old Sep 26, 2010, 7:49 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peripatetic View Post
...
The manual only tells you how, not why.
Very true. It is also true that if you are familiar with the how, the camera will not get in the way of the why.
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Old Sep 26, 2010, 10:55 PM   #10
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The manuals I am familiar with have all had sections explaining exposure, metering, DOF, etc., and give examples of when to use the various functions. Sometimes even why, but for the most part, the why is up to the photographer. Camera manuals do condense the information a lot, but usually contain most everything you need. They don't provide a lot of hand-holding, though, so if you need to have it all explained in great detail, then take advantage of whatever books you like. The authors can probably use the money. And don't just pick one book and expect to learn everything from it. People learn (and teach) in different ways, so getting the information from different perspectives is a good idea.
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