Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > Newbie Help

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Oct 5, 2010, 9:56 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 120
Default What setting should I use at Niagara Fall

Hi All,

We are planning to go to Niagara Fall (Canada side) this coming Nov. I would like to use my Pentax K-X (with kit lens 18-55 and 55 to 300) to take some really nice pictures.

Can you give me some suggestion on how I should set up my camera? I know it depends on many things, but just for my general idea since I am new to dslr.

I will be there day time and night time, I am guessing there will be snow.
At night, there will be Fireworks and Christmas night set up.

Please help me. I am so excited about taking these pictures. I am going to take my not so good tripod with me.

It could be a while before I will go back again. So, nice picture would be nice.

Thanks
raylee011 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Oct 6, 2010, 2:00 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
wave01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: North West England
Posts: 1,748
Default

Hi and first of all enjoy your trip. You are right there are a lot of things that will influence the shoots. The good thing is that you have posted early, wha I would do now is start taking lots of shoots in different lighting conditions and look at the results. No substitute for your own experience. You will learn a lot both by your successes and failures.
When composing your shot look at depth of field large f number large dof small f number shallow dof. Shutter speed faster the speed then the more things a frozen in time, ISO the higher it goes the mor noise.
Last have a great trip and take lots of pics before you go it will not be wasted
wave01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 6, 2010, 4:40 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,544
Default

The falls is bright, as is snow, so you probably won't have much trouble with light, so you won't need to use high ISO settings very often. And shooting with smaller apertures (larger f-numbers) will happen naturally. A smaller aperture will give you a deep depth of field, but you'll still need to watch your focus, because the camera might want to focus on the far side, which would make any foreground objects (like, possibly, your family) out of focus. Since there won't be anything between the freground and the background that you can focus on, in order to get both the foreground and background in focus, you might want to use manual focus and the DoF Preview. Also, since there will be so much that's white (snow, the falls) that you'll need to make sure you expose for the faces. With all that white, the faces might get underexposed. You may want to consider exposure bracketing or even shooting RAW if you've got room for them.
__________________
  • The lens is the thing.
  • 'Full Frame' is the new 'Medium Format'.
  • "One good test is worth a thousand expert opinions." - Tex Johnston, Boeing 707 test pilot.
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 6, 2010, 4:56 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
wave01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: North West England
Posts: 1,748
Default

snow you may want to put in a bit of +ev this will stop the shots looking on the gray side
wave01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 6, 2010, 9:41 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
VTphotog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Extreme Northeastern Vermont, USA
Posts: 4,214
Default

What's the weather going to be like when you are there? Silly question, I know, but your daytime shots are going to depend on the answer. If it is bright and sunny, with snow on the ground, your shutter speeds will be high, and apertures small, even at the lowest ISO setting. There will be lots of contrast, and harsh shadows. You will have to allow for this when posing people, so faces don't get lost in the shade. Learning how to use fill flash would be a good idea beforehand.
OTOH, if it is cloudy and dark, you may have shutter speeds too slow to prevent motion blur unless you boost the ISO sensitivity. You should be comfortable with knowing how to do this.
Nighttime shutter speeds are longer and you will need your tripod.

brian

PS The mist from the falls is considerable, so take along some good microfiber cloths to dry your lens. I'm not a big fan of filters to protect the lens, but in this case, if you are going to tour the falls themselves, it might be really good idea.

Last edited by VTphotog; Oct 6, 2010 at 11:32 AM. Reason: added PS
VTphotog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 6, 2010, 10:55 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 1,093
Default

One other thing to consider is how you want the falls to look. Personally, I gag every time I see those "cotton candy" waterfalls long exposures. But obviously a lot of people think they are absolutely wonderful. If you want to turn the power of Niagra Falls into a kitten photo, you may want to consider picking up a neutral density filter to allow you to slow down your shutter speed.
tclune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 6, 2010, 11:24 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,544
Default

Actually, for that kind of effect, you need to be a lot closer to a falls than you can get at Niagra.
__________________
  • The lens is the thing.
  • 'Full Frame' is the new 'Medium Format'.
  • "One good test is worth a thousand expert opinions." - Tex Johnston, Boeing 707 test pilot.
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 8, 2010, 2:39 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 120
Default

Thanks for all the advices. I guess, basically, it is best for me to try shooting the same picture (post) with different setting until I find the one that I like the most. I am going to summarize your advices and put it on a small piece of paper and take it with me. I totally understand what you guys are talking about, but I find it so many times that I forgot what I need to do at the location (memory not working). LOL
raylee011 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 8, 2010, 8:10 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
frank-in-toronto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Toronto Canada
Posts: 1,083
Default

I was using the OptiTech rainSleeve in a light drizzle last week. Loved it. Set my camera to LiveView, auto af and had the lens hood on. I tightened the rain sleeve opening up on the hood and as long as I held the camera pointing down, no issues. Mist might be a little tougher. But you could duck the end inside your jacket when your not actively taking a shot. Don't miss the sunset opportunities. The sun will be behind you so look for the rainbow.
frank-in-toronto is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 12, 2010, 12:52 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 120
Default

By the way, how do you take picture of fireworks?
raylee011 is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:47 AM.