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Old Aug 5, 2011, 8:49 PM   #1
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Hi fellow photographers

A quick question : im shotting with a Nikon D90 with a Nikor 28-200 G model lens, I use my photos for both computer work and making prints at about the same ratio, what would be the best image format to shot in. most of the time I shot in regular JPEG Normal this works great for making CDs and prints, working with the images on the computer is another issue with resharping being my biggest, some images turn out near perfect with just a hit or two off the sharpen scale others are a little blurred and then jump to being to focused. Some softwere sharpens off the photos contrast which is where Im stuck, the better way would be to sharpen off the angle of the lines in the picture Right? im not sure where I should be as far as my image setting goes JPEG or RAW, some of my photo sites wont upload RAW images only JPEG types. If I shot in RAW and Note: this was a suggestion from the photo rep at the camera store the idea being that the image resharpens better in RAW than JPEG, agine the linuar lines in the photo came up.. Heres the questions I have, if I shot in RAW can I still make photo CDs and prints just as I do in JPEG, as for the computer when I work up a photo off RAW format and save it for uploading I then get two images saved one in JPEG and the other in RAW. " Man " I hope this makes sense to some of you out there.

Thanks for the help and advice John....
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Old Aug 5, 2011, 9:15 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by monty20072 View Post
Heres the questions I have, if I shot in RAW can I still make photo CDs and prints just as I do in JPEG, as for the computer when I work up a photo off RAW format and save it for uploading I then get two images saved one in JPEG and the other in RAW. " Man " I hope this makes sense to some of you out there.Thanks for the help and advice John....
Welcome, John!

RAW is just data, and as such, you need a program that can read that data, in order to be able to use it.

As an example, my antique version of Photoshop refuses to open RAW files. I must save as a BMP, TIFF or JPEG first.

RAW is better to work with because it is pure. The color in the RAW file is the color that the camera recorded. Once you convert to another format, it loses some information and is no longer in the same state that it was to begin with.

Since RAW is just data, you certainly can put it on a CD. However, unless whatever is reading that disc can read RAW files, then you won't be able to see the images. But, if you have two computers, both with the software that can read the images, then yes, you'll be able to see them.

HTH!
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Old Aug 5, 2011, 9:19 PM   #3
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RAW files are usually big and readable by very few programs unlike JPEG which is a universal format.

Nikon RAW format files need to be processed by software such as Nikon Capture NX or Adobe Camera Raw followed by Photoshop or Photoshop Elements. Once processed the image file can be saved in JPEG format for distribution or printing.

This processing is called workflow and from RAW you can adjust colour balance, exposure, orientation, tilting, colour casts and sharpness within limits. Workflow isn't a trivial task so you should seek out books and courses on digital image processing to aquire the necessary skills.

Scott Kelby has a number of excellent books on Photoshop, Photoshop Elements and digital photography in general.
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Old Aug 6, 2011, 6:24 AM   #4
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Heres my take I shoot RAW they are large files but they contain all the data of that shot. They are like a digital negative. From here you can resize them any way you want but you will still have the original files there. So to develop them you will need a RAW converter Photoshop elements 9 is a good all round program that uses Camera Raw and then you can go into elements to do more editing. Good Luck
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Old Aug 6, 2011, 8:38 AM   #5
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For my D90, I shoot Large Fine JPEG.

There are multiple factors that you should consider when you decide between JPEG and RAW. First, all JPEG files are compressed while RAW Files are not (or at least they are losslessly compressed), so if you do a lot of prints, RAW files will produce better results especially at larger print sizes.

Second, RAW files require post-processing, but because they contain more data, boundries for post-prcessing are much less restrictive for RAW files than for JPEG files. (For this purpose, if you only have one chance to get the shot, you should use RAW. It will give you the greater chance to correct problems with, and fine tune an image.)

Third, RAW Files are BIG, which means they require a lot of storage space in your camera and on your computer, and they take a long time to transfer to the memory card and to your computer. An unfortunate consequence of this is that you can't capture RAW files continuously as quickly as you can with JPEG.
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Old Aug 6, 2011, 12:41 PM   #6
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Worth reading this article:

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tu...aw-files.shtml
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Old Aug 7, 2011, 5:32 PM   #7
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Thanks everyone for your help and advice. John
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Old Aug 8, 2011, 8:38 AM   #8
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IMHO the time to use RAW is when I am unsure of the best exposure and/or white balance. Raw has better options for adjustment in post processing.
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Old Oct 8, 2011, 9:40 PM   #9
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An unfortunate consequence of this is that you can't capture RAW files continuously as quickly as you can with JPEG.
Right. I dont see how you could shoot burst with 10mb files as fast as 750kb jpgs. Ifcourse DSLRs shoot burst shots fast as it is anyway.So, if shooting your baby's first steps or the royal wedding, use RAW; if shooting birds, your cat, uncle Moe shootin' the breeze, a night out with your college buddies whom you wont see but 3 months after graduation use economy jpg.
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