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Old Aug 25, 2011, 12:17 PM   #21
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Huh?
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Old Aug 25, 2011, 12:21 PM   #22
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Huh?
It's about using the right tool for the job. Different jobs require different tools.
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Old Aug 25, 2011, 12:26 PM   #23
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Yes, but my point was that buying an IS lens and not using the IS is NOT the same as buying a non-IS lens - it's inferior because of the extra cost, weight, complexity (and hence fragility) and sometimes poorer IQ.
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Old Aug 25, 2011, 6:17 PM   #24
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So, for macro shots the best approach is to use a tripod. How do you set it up without scareing away the bugs animals? Or you try to lure those after you set everything up?
One thing I still don't quite get is for kids, and other moving things, IS or no IS, I have been reading some contradicting info on this.
One last question can I use a canon 100 macro IS and non IS with a teleconverter? I heard it is not possible with the non IS but for the Is version heard some people using some Raynox 1.4 not sure with model...
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Old Aug 25, 2011, 6:26 PM   #25
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insect macro shooting is all about patience. Take you time setup and wait. Baiting helps.

Yes you can add a tc to the canon ef lenses.
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Old Aug 26, 2011, 4:27 AM   #26
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You could try putting glue down on a leaf? Only kidding! lol
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Old Aug 26, 2011, 7:49 AM   #27
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If you want to learn about insect macro I suggest going over to the fred miranda forums - they have a macro section there with some very advanced macro shooters.
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Old Aug 27, 2011, 12:43 AM   #28
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So, for macro shots the best approach is to use a tripod. How do you set it up without scareing away the bugs animals? Or you try to lure those after you set everything up?
It's interesting that no one mentioned to you the use of flash...
It solves two problems at once:
1. Since the flash pulse is so fast it negates the need of IS/VR (or a tripod)
2. You'll need a lot of light to close the shutter down for that larger DOF

-> ... and you can shoot action with macro (I did this a while back), unlike a tripod or IS/VR:



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Old Aug 27, 2011, 11:44 AM   #29
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The only problem with shooting macro is that not all macro lenses allow you to use on-board flash. You often (should, may be required) have an external flash, which brings additional complications/weight/expense etc. That's an entirely different topic!
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Old Aug 27, 2011, 12:33 PM   #30
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I would have thought a major problem is maintaining focus. With most macro lenses there will be minimal depth of field, and unless you're using a tripod and focussing rig even achieving focus will be difficult. Maintaining it on a live insect will be well-nigh impossible.

For photographing live insects or even leaves swaying in the wind I'd always choose a macro-capable lens with a long focal length. That also greatly relieves the lighting problem, as the lens isn't so close to the subject as to shield available light. But achieving greater than 1:1 magnification in these circumstances is I think pretty well impossible.

The word "macro" means different things to different people. Back in film days I used to use my excellent Tamron SP 70-210 lens that gave me 1:2 magnification with a long working distance and no lighting problems, and I could and regularly did take hand-held "macro" shots. Some of the current 1:1 lenses will be similar in operation. But if "macro" means to you greater than 1:1 then you're getting into a specialist operation needing specialist equipment and considerable patience and experience. Expect lots of failed shots, something I couldn't afford when I was using film.
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