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Old Jan 18, 2004, 9:05 PM   #1
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Default Question about image sizes.

I have a 3.2 MP canon a70 camera. If I take a picture with the highest resolution( 2048 x 1536), will my 4 x 6 print be clearer and better looking than if I printed one taken with a 1024 x 768 resolution? Or will the smaller resolution print out clearer as a 4 x 6 print?
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Old Jan 18, 2004, 9:32 PM   #2
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Default Re: Question about image sizes.

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Originally Posted by nirvanajack
I have a 3.2 MP canon a70 camera. If I take a picture with the highest resolution( 2048 x 1536), will my 4 x 6 print be clearer and better looking than if I printed one taken with a 1024 x 768 resolution? Or will the smaller resolution print out clearer as a 4 x 6 print?
Hi nirvanajack, I guess it will be more blurry... since you'll give to printer less details than you have on 2048 *1536 image...
if you have a Photoshop I can give advice you to do it this way I'm producing photos. as you maybe got poor quality because you didn't constrain proportions of the image.
so here is how I'm doing this, just create new image and in presets drop down menu choose 4x6 size. After this open your original image, apply all color adjustments and crop all not necessary details, after this just copy layer from original window to new 4 x6 project you just created, 4 x 6 should 1200 x 1800 in pixels so probably you'll need to downsize the picture, to do this CTRL+0(to fit image on the page), than click "CTRL+T" to enable free transform tool, and after this start to resize your image holding SHIFT key(this is to constrain proportions of your image. After you finished placement of your layer simply confirm this and you'll be ready for print. I would advice you to print at least with 300 DPI settings on your printer as this is the amount of details which could be distinct by human's eye.
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Old Jan 19, 2004, 3:35 AM   #3
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A simpler way to do that in Photoshop is to use the rectangular marquee tool with the style set to "contrained aspect ratio". Set the width at 3 and the height at 2. Then drag a rectangle across your picture. It will automatically make the height the right proportion for the width. Then you can move the rectangle up or down until it contains the part of the picture you want, and then select "crop" from the image menu. You'll be left with a picture that's the right shape for a 4x6 print. If you take your pictures to a lab, and turn in pictures to be printed without cropping them first, the printer will either crop the picture itself (and without your control over what's getting cut out), which isn't good, or possibly stretch it to the right shape, which is even worse.
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Old Jan 19, 2004, 9:10 AM   #4
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Hi UrbanPhotos, couldn't disagree that your way is a bit more elegant than mine as it's more visual so you can get idea how your photo would look like, but I think I get too used to mine... :P
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Old Jan 22, 2004, 2:00 AM   #5
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Hey guys thanks for the help, but my question was actually simpler than that.

I just want to know whic format should I use to print a 4x6 photo.
should I take the 2048 x 1536 pictures, or should I take them in 1024 x 768 resolution?

I have a program that will auto-fit them to the 4x6 size, I just want to know in which resolution will I get more details printing it as a 4 x6.

I know that to print an 8 x 10, the 2048 x 1536 is better, but I'm not sure if I will lose details printing it as 4 x 6, and if printing a 1021 x 768 as 4x6 will be clearer.
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Old Jan 22, 2004, 2:49 AM   #6
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I see, as for size it depend from your printer and which DPI you're using for printing your photorgraphs, e.g. if you print with 300 dots per inch ideally you should give to printer image 1200x1800.
if you printing with less DPI you can go for smaller image. So my answer would be yes, it's better to use 2048*1536(but you shouldn't let you program to size it for you generally since it's most likely screw it).
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Old Jan 22, 2004, 1:19 PM   #7
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Regardless of whether you print yourself or take the images to Wal-Mart the images pixels have to be reassigned in the print spooler or Fuji equipment. It is not possible to degrade the image by giving the printer or photofinisher a higher resolution image. And it is almost impossible to match the output so the spooler or printing equipment doesn’t have to do some interpolation.

In short you will not get a better print by shooting at lower resolution. But if you are shooting at low resolution and get a great shot you want on the wall you are going to get crappy results. I would shoot at the highest resolution unless you are trying to get by with the memory card that came with the camera.
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Old Feb 21, 2004, 7:52 PM   #8
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really the best way is to set your camera on a tripod or other sturdy surface, take two pictures (one in each resolution) and then print them both. At most, you loose one picture but end up with a simple answer to your dilemma.

At least that is the simple answer to the simple question you ask.

I think you are really asking a more difficult question however and that is what slipe and the others are addressing and without knowing the specifics of your equipment (other than the pixel dimensions of your photograph) it is a difficult question to answer.

Generally:

To much resolution can degrade the print quality just as too little resolution can. Your printer can only handle so many dpi (dots per inch) and if you supply more information than it can handle some information needs to be removed and it might just end up being critical information that is left out opposed to irrelevant information that you can control through post production work.

I suggest if you want the more difficult answer you do a google search on dpi, ppi, and resolution to learn what you are looking for and then consult your equipment specifications to learn its capabilities.
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Old Feb 22, 2004, 10:20 AM   #9
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Quote:
To much resolution can degrade the print quality just as too little resolution can. Your printer can only handle so many dpi (dots per inch) and if you supply more information than it can handle some information needs to be removed and it might just end up being critical information that is left out opposed to irrelevant information that you can control through post production work. .
I respectfully disagree. The print spooler has to resample to add or discard pixels regardless of how many you provide and it is better to discard than add. It doesn’t matter whether it discards just a few or many, the output at a given print quality is going to be about the same as long as it is discarding pixels. The print quality only degrades if the print spooler doesn’t have enough pixels. It is usually better to upsample the image in a good editor with a good filter and even that doesn’t in any way make up for the lost pixels causing lower resolution – it just gives a little smoother low resolution print.

I recently had to print some shots for an ID that were something like an 1 X 7/8 inch. I used the full resolution of a 5Mp image after a little cropping and the tiny print was as good as anything I have printed on my photo printer, even though they were probably well over a thousand PPI after the size reduction with no resample. You don’t degrade the print quality by having more pixels than the printer or photo processing equipment can use – just by not having enough.
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Old Feb 22, 2004, 3:25 PM   #10
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Quote:
I respectfully disagree. The print spooler has to resample to add or discard pixels regardless of how many you provide and it is better to discard than add. It doesn’t matter whether it discards just a few or many, the output at a given print quality is going to be about the same as long as it is discarding pixels. The print quality only degrades if the print spooler doesn’t have enough pixels. It is usually better to upsample the image in a good editor with a good filter and even that doesn’t in any way make up for the lost pixels causing lower resolution – it just gives a little smoother low resolution print.
slipe, I'm totally agreed with you on this, my experience show that discarding pixels never hurt to image although to speed up process it make sense to discard those pixels in editor(if speed and memory doesn't limiting you it's rather not necessary step).
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