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Old Jan 23, 2004, 8:23 PM   #1
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Default :?: Resolution and Size of photos when posting?

Hi all,

I have my photos stored and can provide links for posting. However, what size of file and pixel width/height should I compress my photos to for posting here on the message board?

I guess I should know this by now, but I don't. ops:

Like, when I go to "resize"--what size should I resize to? I keep resizing and either the dpi or the actual size of the photo is off.

Any tips would be greatly appreciated. :lol:

Beep Beep,
Darby
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Old Jan 23, 2004, 10:48 PM   #2
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In photoshop I just set the longest edge to 600 pixels, this causes the shorter edge to become somewhere around 400 pixels.

You an go bigger or smaller, I just chose that size as somethng that would fit on most peoples browser window.

The other settings like dpi are meaningless for web display, a monitor can't change the number of dots it show per inch

When saving for web I usually pick jpg with a quality of 6, for me this seems to produce a file that is fairly small(30k-80k) and still quite viewable. YMMV

Oh, one thing just in case don't save back into the original image
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Old Jan 24, 2004, 1:07 AM   #3
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I have three photo editing programs and only one I resize with(seems like they should all be the same when it comes to resizing but apparently not). You need to play around a little to find what creates the least compression distortion. 800x600 works best for me although with some I've gone smaller.

Luck Kayd :P
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Old Jan 24, 2004, 6:46 AM   #4
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One school of thought suggests that you use a fixed fraction of your camera's resolution setting, which still gives a comfortable size on a monitor set for 800x600 resolution. I.e that may not be a full screen, but is claimed to give the least rounding errors when downsampling. I just looked at one of my PS actions which I set for 708X532. Although this is OK for slideshows and a critical viewing assesment, I'd consider it a bit large for linking if there were several in a post. Don't forget some users have slow modems and graphics cards which makes linking annoying sometimes, so a fraction or 2 lower might be better.

On the point of compression, there is a trade off decision between reducing resolution or increasing it and using more or less compression to get files over the net to slow connections. In some tests I did a while ago, I was surprised that some pics looked better with scaled down resolution kept as bitmap files, compared to higher res, compressed JPEG to a similar file size.

If a post including the linked files starts to get over about 50-75 Kb, then I feel for members with slower connections. That's the good thing about Pbase, you get the thumbnails then choose the res according to needs and connection speed. VOX
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Old Jan 24, 2004, 8:28 PM   #5
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Larger files are not only a pain to download but viewing can be a stinker. Scrolling back and forth and up and down. I just looked at my uploads and though I may upload at 800x600 I link smaller. Will try Vox's suggestion for bitmap.

Kayd
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Old Jan 24, 2004, 9:35 PM   #6
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Having a connection that never is faster than 26.4Kbps, I think small file size is a really good idea.

Keep in mind that the best physical and file size are only very loosely related. If you are going to put up a close-up of a butterflies wing, you might want to put up a small (~200x200pixel) image with very low compression. That could easily have a bigger file size than a largish (~400x600 pixel) image of a foggy landscape with lots of compression.

Context is also important to figure the kind of file you want to put up. An image in one of the Post Your Photos forums is normally bigger than an illustration of noise/JPEG artifacts/purple fringing/.... needs to be. Control the size with tight cropping for the technical photos: a huge file isn't needed to see a hot pixel.
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Old Jan 24, 2004, 9:38 PM   #7
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I set the largest side to be 800 pixels and let the software (Photoshop CS in my case) scale the other side to keep the same proportions.

I've been aiming for about 100K, but all the comments here have made me thing that I'm wrong... maybe I should go for smaller. I think I'll shoot for 60-70K.

Eric
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Old Jan 24, 2004, 10:33 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eric s
... I've been aiming for about 100K, but all the comments here have made me thing that I'm wrong... maybe I should go for smaller. ...
Thank you, thank you!

The "best" size (both file and pixel) is likely to be higher here than most other places a picture is posted. Here one of the points is often to show what a camera can do. In many other situations, a much lower resolution photo is needed to tell a story.

A 14Kbyte image can be good enough to show how our house was built. When there are a lot of them, even that size can mean waiting for a download to finish.
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Old Jan 24, 2004, 10:53 PM   #9
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Default Thank-you all!

Thank-you to: PeterP, ImKayd1, voxmagna, BillDrew, , Eric S and anyone I may have overlooked by accident!

Ok, so here's what I've learned from your replies :-)

~Keep the longest length 600
~Don't Save Back Into Original Photo ( I do this every so often, thanks for the reminder)
~Save For Web, quality of 6
~800x600 is a good size
~Bitmap helps size
~50-70kb is good for slow connect
~Make it small if you want high detail and larger for pics that don't require detail as the focus.

Ok, phew, now I have a much better understanding! I would like to post photos to the wild animals, up close and such on Stevesforums message board.

I'm working with Photoshop Elements. So, when I bring a photo in and go to "Resize" the image, I am given a window that lets me change the width/height (constrained, so I only change one) or I can change the dpi from 72 to higher.

Then, I use "save for the web" which allows me to save the photo as a gif or jpeg etc. I usually choose a jpeg for photos.

This thread has really helped!

Here's hoping you see me posting photos soon.

Thank-you sooooo much!

Beep Beep,
Darby :-)
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Old Jan 25, 2004, 12:52 AM   #10
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i would recommend using the same aspect ratio that your camera records an image in.
my 10d's resolution is 3008X2006(approx).. or... 3:2 aspect ratio. i usually size files in the range of 720X480. large enough it doesnt take an eon to upload or download (i am on dialup) but still good enough that it can be appreciated the way you would like to to be.
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