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Old Feb 28, 2012, 9:55 AM   #11
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I will post them here as soon as I can. I will get the tower shot tonight and then wait on the full moon.
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Old Feb 28, 2012, 10:03 AM   #12
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... The only time the Moon is Full is when it's on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun, ....
That means no one has ever seen a completely lit full moon since with that alignment there will be an eclipse. If you insist on no shadows at all on the surface of the moon, you are demanding the impossible.

A day or so each side of the full moon there is a barely perceptible shadow.
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Old Feb 28, 2012, 1:38 PM   #13
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That means no one has ever seen a completely lit full moon since with that alignment there will be an eclipse.
Most of the time, the Moon's orbit places it above or below the Earth (with respect to the Sun), so Full Moons are a regular occurance, though eclipses do happen. This is also what keeps New Moons from causing a Total Eclipse of the Sun every 29.5 days.
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Old Feb 28, 2012, 8:05 PM   #14
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Most of the time, the Moon's orbit places it above or below the Earth (with respect to the Sun), so Full Moons are a regular occurance, though eclipses do happen. This is also what keeps New Moons from causing a Total Eclipse of the Sun every 29.5 days.
Very true. And when the moon is below/above at the full moon, part of the shaded area is visible from earth.

So strictly, there is never a time when all visible parts of the moon are sun lit.

For photography, anything within a day or so is close enough for just about anything.
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Old Feb 29, 2012, 4:05 AM   #15
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That depends on what you're after.

The orbit of the Moon around the Earth is tilted by about 5.145°, so that's the maximum amount the position of the Moon will be off from square. Conversely, one day before or after the Full Moon is about a 12° difference. So even if you're shooting the Moon as little as twelve hours either before or after the Moon is in opposition, the shadows at the Moon's Poles will always be less than the shadows on either side.

Sometimes that matters, and sometimes it doesn't.
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Old Feb 29, 2012, 10:02 AM   #16
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I remember, at an early age (3-4), my father would take me to the Hayden Planetarium, part of the American Museum of Natural History in New York City.

During one of those trips, I remember the narrator describing the difficulty of photographing a Full Moon. If you took the photo even just slightly before the Moon was in opposition with the Sun, then one edge of the Moon's disk would be sharp, but the other would be poorly illuminated. If you took the photo just slightly after opposition, the situation was reversed. And, of course, taking the photo at the exact moment of opposition was difficult because it wouldn't necessarily happen when your camera had a good view of it.

He explained that the photos the planetarium sold had sharp edges on both sides of the Moon, because they would use two photos, one taken just before opposition, and one taken just after, and put them together to form a single image of the Moon, that had sharp edges on both sides.

So I learned at an early age, that photographs could be lies.

Now, to be sure, this technique would be overkill for what Jbird87 wants to do, but it does illustrate the difficulty of photographing a Full Moon.

A friend of mine, Robert Severi, wanted to photograph the Full Moon with his Canon 1Ds Mk II so he could play around with it. He rented a long lens, but was disappointed with the results he got because he couldn't get a really sharp disc all the way around. I told him the above story, and he understood why.
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Old Mar 5, 2012, 8:48 PM   #17
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Getting close but I suck at photoshop.

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Old Mar 6, 2012, 12:51 AM   #18
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Actually, that looks pretty good.

I have a few comments, though. The photo of the 8-ball places it squarely in the center of the image. If you were actually taking a photo of this juxtaposition in nature, you'd frame it so the 8-ball was on one side of the frame and the Moon would be on the other. So when you shoot the 8-ball, it should be with plenty of space on one side for the Moon to appear.

Also, from the image of the 8-ball, it's clear that the Sun is above and to the left of the 8-ball, but from the image of the Moon, the Sun is above and to the right. So in addition to you placing the Moon in the frame where it couldn't ever possibly be, you can play another trick on the viewer by flipping the Moon image, so it looks more "natural". This could be another little private joke you're playing on the viewer. See how many people notice.

Lastly, is there any possibility that you could have taken the shot of the 8-ball with something better than the loading dock in the background?
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Old Mar 6, 2012, 7:42 AM   #19
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This was just a quick hand held shot of the moon and of the 8 ball. I wanted to see how it looked with different size moons, and practice my Photoshop skills or lack of skills.

The loading dock is about the best shot to get the entire tower in the pic with the 8 showing. I might need to play a photo trick there also.

The moon shot has much more detail in full size photo, when I resize it, or paste it in the 8 ball pic; it loses so much of its texture. Am I missing some setting or do I need to save the resized image in higher quality than 8?

This pic is far better than most shots of our tower that I have seen; even still I would like to knock people’s socks off with a great shot. Thanks to everyone so far on all the help.
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Old Mar 6, 2012, 7:59 AM   #20
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Yes, downsampling the Moon will lose some resolution, especially if you do it in one step.

Personally, I don't think there's anything wrong with a really big Moon, but if you want it to look like something you caught in a single shot, then I think the Moon should be about the same size as the 8-ball, maybe even smaller

One of the things you could do with the shots you have is to put the larger Moon behind the smaller 8-ball (It could be your town's own private eclipse.) Then, the loss of sharpness in the Moon photo will be less apparent in the final result.

I think you should get a good series of photos of the 8-ball, and try photographing the Moon at a variety of focal lengths. Then you can try different size Moons (without resizing them) with different 8-ball shots, and select the composition you and your mayor like best.
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