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Old Apr 2, 2012, 11:27 PM   #1
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sRGB or Adobe RGB? That is the question.

I was in sRGB and somehow I changed to Adobe RGB and now I'm having issues w/ my prints.

I think it's opperator error but I don't understand. I shot in Adobe RGB and after I edited my pics in Lightroom I exported in sRGB. I sent my prints to MPIX and they came back dark. Is this my fault?

What setting should I be in?

Thanks!!
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Old Apr 3, 2012, 4:37 AM   #2
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hi general rule is the colour space should be set the same all through your process. so if you take in SRGB then edit in SRGB. what does the site want them sent in
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Old Apr 3, 2012, 8:03 AM   #3
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sRGB is popular because it closely matches the performance of most monitors. AdobeRGB has more descrete colors, mostly greens, but most monitors can't display them all, so the colors won't look real on a conventional monitor. JPEG files are limited to 8 bit color. That's 8 bits for each of red, green, and blue, for a total of more than 16 million distince colors, which is a lot considering the human eye/brain can only distinguish about 10 million. Both sRGB and AdobeRGB can fit in JPEG, but JPEG is mostly for the general distribution of images, especially where you can't control the kind of equipment that's used to display it. So if you're going to make a JPEG file to upload or e-mail an image, you should use sRGB. And if you don't have a wide gamut monitor where you can see all the extra colors in AdobeRGB, you shouldn't edit an image that uses AdobeRGB.

If you have a problem with an AdobeRGB image, it's probably because you edited it using a monitor that's displaying sRGB colors. If you hadn't edited it, it probably would have printed fine.
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Old Apr 3, 2012, 2:11 PM   #4
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Dark prints are often the result of editing on a monitor that is too bright in relation to the ambient lighting of the room you edit in.
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Old Apr 3, 2012, 2:42 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NewsyL View Post
Dark prints are often the result of editing on a monitor that is too bright in relation to the ambient lighting of the room you edit in.
Or just too bright, whatever the reason.

You can go though the time, effort, and possibly the expense of calibrating your monitor, or you can simply apply the ICC profile of it.
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Old Apr 3, 2012, 6:34 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wink11 View Post
sRGB or Adobe RGB? That is the question.

I was in sRGB and somehow I changed to Adobe RGB and now I'm having issues w/ my prints.

Thanks!!
If you have not embedded the aRGB profile, the printing software is going to assume sRGB, and print accordingly. This can cause not only dark prints, but color shifts as well. Not all printer drivers can recognize aRGB, either. Unless you were having issues with your previous prints, it would probably be best to stay with sRGB.
Something that is not often discussed when mentioning the wider color gamut of aRGB, is that it still uses 8 bits per color, so the wider gamut results in larger increments between shades. This isn't a problem most of the time, but I have seen occasions where it results in color banding.

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Old Apr 3, 2012, 7:02 PM   #7
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Something that is not often discussed when mentioning the wider color gamut of aRGB, is that it still uses 8 bits per color, so the wider gamut results in larger increments between shades. This isn't a problem most of the time, but I have seen occasions where it results in color banding.
8 bits per color is plenty. That's 16 million colors, which is about 6 million more than we can distinguish anyway. If you're seeing banding, I don't think it's because of AdobeRGB. It might be because of an Adobe RGB image being downsampled to sRGB in post processing.
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Old Apr 6, 2012, 3:49 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wink11 View Post
sRGB or Adobe RGB? That is the question.

I was in sRGB and somehow I changed to Adobe RGB and now I'm having issues w/ my prints.

I think it's opperator error but I don't understand. I shot in Adobe RGB and after I edited my pics in Lightroom I exported in sRGB. I sent my prints to MPIX and they came back dark. Is this my fault?

What setting should I be in?

Thanks!!
Either stick to sRGB, OR

1. Get yourself a monitor that can display AdobeRGB.
2. Get a calibration device.
3. Shoot in AdobeRGB.

Either way, don't "Export" go to the print module and print to JPG, use the new brightness slider to adjust the JPG sRGB "print". Do a run of test prints with different brightness adjustments for the print shop you are using, (put some text on in PS, or have a card in the picture with the adjustment you are going to dial in written on so you can't get confused later - the print shop may not return them in any kind of order).

Once you have some test prints then save a preset in the print module for that print shop which includes the brightness adjustment.

This is a fabulous enhancement in LR4 for people who use cheap external print services.

It's hard to exaggerate how brilliant this feature really is, because different services require different adjustments (they all make different assumptions and configurations) and being able to have a setting that does not need to be applied to the original image is fantastic.

Otherwise I would sometimes have many virtual copies: one for my own printer, one for small prints from Jessops online, another for Kodak online if I wanted Kodak paper for a particlar image, another for Photobox, another if I was exporting the image to use in a Blurb book, etc.

Now it's just 4 or 5 presets in the print module which can be easily applied to a batch of images at the time the JPG is printed.

You still have to decide whether you want a Relative or Perceptual mapping of out-of-gamut colors or an image-by-image basis, but usually Relative works well enough, and just overriding on a few images is easy enough, especially now that LR4 has soft proofing!

Finally, make sure that the print shop isn't auto-adjusting, because if they do then you just need to use someone else because you will never ever get a good print from them!

If ^^^ doesn't make much sense to you, then you should buy the Luminous Landscape LR4 video tutorials.
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Last edited by peripatetic; Apr 6, 2012 at 4:06 AM.
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Old Apr 8, 2012, 11:09 PM   #9
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Wow...thanks everyone who responded.

This is alot to digest and I'm sure I'll be referring back to this. I switched back to the sRGB for now. I hope one day to upgrade my computer and invest in some calibration. For now I'll have to keep testing.

I'm curious about a few (many!) things mentioned here and know I'll have more questions. Learing is growing!!

Jen
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