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Old Feb 1, 2004, 8:18 AM   #11
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I would disagree on the paper part. I've printed photos at the same time on two different papers, with one fading, and the other not.

I've got some photos printed on an inkjet that have lasted for years without fading. I've also got some photos that faded badly after only a few months on other papers.

Yes, the ink is important, but the paper is, too IMO.

Also, as Kodak just announced, that have a new paper designed to lock in the inks, in a way that they do not deteriorate from modern inkjets. I'll probably end up trying some of this new paper soon (if it's not too expensive).
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Old Feb 1, 2004, 8:40 AM   #12
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I would disagree on the paper part
I defer to your experience--what I really was trying to say is that it doesn't matter what paper you have if your inks are not stable/permanent to begin with. With my old Epson, I could print on any kind of ordinary copy paper all the way up to Epson's most expensive glossy photo stuff, but they'd fade equally fast. I'm excited to do more printing on the new G800, though, since I've heard longevity has been improved. Maybe I can finally display some actual framed photos on the wall again!
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Old Feb 1, 2004, 8:51 AM   #13
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I'll probably end up trying some of this new paper soon (if it's not too expensive).
Jim, what kind of printer are you using? I ask because, so far, Kodak paper and my Epson don't get along well at all. In any case, if and when you try their new paper, please report to all of us how good or bad you find it to be.
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Old Feb 1, 2004, 9:14 AM   #14
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Barbara:

I'm currently using an HP Photosmart 1215. It seems to "like" Kodak Papers.

My last printer was an Epson, and it didn't like the Kodak papers. Most of the time, I used the Epson Heavyweight Matte paper with it.

I ended up replacing the Epson, due to constant clogging, requiring too many cleaning cycles when the printer sat for too long. It finally got to where I couldn't clean one of the nozzles at all (trying multiple cleaning cycles), and Best Buy gave me credit towards a new printer (they said that they no longer tried to repair it under the extended warranty).

I haven't had this problem with the HP (it never, ever clogs).

You've got a 1270, right? Heck, I probably have some cartridges that would work in yours sitting in my office. I think my last printer (780) used the same ink as yours.

I want a new printer, but I'll probably need to wait until we get our home sold (we're getting ready to put it on the market now).

I'm leaning towards the i9100 Canon right now. However, I understand that it's a little "finnicky" on paper too (although some of the Red River Papers work fine in it, based on forum posts I've read).

Again, the best paper I've ever used was "Target" brand (OEM'd by an unknown supplier). I've been looking around the office for the box (I saved it). It even had photos on the back describing the multiple layers it used to lock in the ink.

I've got photos from several years ago printed on this paper that look as good as new.
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Old Feb 1, 2004, 11:05 AM   #15
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Until I read that an Epson should be turned on at least once a week whether you're planning on printing or not, I had problems too, though not with the printer itself, but with the cartridges. It doesn't make a person very happy to have to throw out a half-full color cartridge.

I just looked at the boxes of my unopened cartridges and found that, yes, the black cartridge is the same for the 780, but the color cartridge isn't. Weird, no?

I'll tell you what, if the new Kodak paper can deliver what it promises, I'll struggle to get my settings correct for it. I have no problem with the way the ink gets laid down on it; instead, it's the color casts that drive me batty. These, however, can be corrected for.
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Old Feb 1, 2004, 11:21 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by bcoultry
Until I read that an Epson should be turned on at least once a week whether you're planning on printing or not, I had problems too, though not with the printer itself, but with the cartridges. It doesn't make a person very happy to have to throw out a half-full color cartridge.
Yes, I think that was my main problem (leaving it unused for long period of time).

I have an HP Laserjet that I use for documents. So, I only used the inkjet for photos.

As a result, the heads seem to be clogged, almost everytime I'd go to print photos (requiring multiple cleaning cycles).

If I would have used it more often, I probably wouldn't have been as dissapointed with it.

It was capable of very nice prints (if you made sure the heads were unclogged, and the printer was properly aligned).

But for consistency (no hassles with clogged heads, or alignment problems), I really like the HP.

It also has an auto alignment system, as well as auto paper type detector (I think it uses some type of laser for alignment and paper detection). I've found it to work great!

The only problem I had with photos from the HP, was that the default settings tended to lay down the ink a little too heavy. But, once I changed the ink volume settings, I get consistently great prints on a variety of paper types.
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Old Feb 1, 2004, 12:38 PM   #17
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The HP that I had prior to the Epson gave good quality as long as I brightened the photo and gave it a cyan cast just prior to printing, but it was very consistent in being too dark and too red, so these faults were easily overcome. The longevity of the ink, however, was a whole other story. All prints turned magenta very quickly.

I was having Epson clogging problems for exactly the same reason as you. I use a cheap Canon for everything but photos, and I can go through long, dry periods without a single picture worth printing. So now I use the Epson to print CD labels and other things that periodically come up that have a variety of color in them. The Epson is behaving much better now...

...but I keep thinking about that Epson 2200. 8)
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Old Feb 1, 2004, 8:43 PM   #18
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My wife is the scrapbooker in our family. We use an Epson 1270 and use Epson Heavyweight Matte paper. We pre-print pages using a low cost scrapbooking software program to get the placement and photo sizes correct, then cut them down for matting on the final page... We usually print borders and headings, then mount the mounted photos on the page. The wide carriage 1270 will do 12 X 12 pages. We normally make two pages, one with everything in it and a second one without the pictures and one with just the titles. Pages that are printed look flat, so we do a physical cut and paste to add interest.

The advantage of using a scrapbooking program is we aren't stuck with the "standard" size prints available from a film camera. We sometimes scan old pix and re-size them to fit any page being made.
As far as fading is concerned, we've never encounterd problems in our scrapbooks, nor even with large (13 X 19) photos matted and framed on our walls.
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Old Feb 2, 2004, 7:23 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wildman
My wife is the scrapbooker in our family. We use an Epson 1270 and use Epson Heavyweight Matte paper. We pre-print pages using a low cost scrapbooking software program to get the placement and photo sizes correct, then cut them down for matting on the final page...

The advantage of using a scrapbooking program is we aren't stuck with the "standard" size prints available from a film camera. We sometimes scan old pix and re-size them to fit any page being made.
When I had my Epson, I usually used the Heavyweight Matte Paper, too. BTW, Epson "Film Factory" has an album pages feature that I use. It allows you to select photos for your pages, then pick from album pages templates.

You can then rearrange and resize photo you place on the album pages, and even put text boxes underneath photos with a choice of fonts.

I still use this software often. It's included with some Epson products, or you can download a trial version from http://www.epsonsoftware.com
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Old Feb 3, 2004, 12:01 PM   #20
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Just getting around to checking on my responses. I have tried a variety of paper and the best, IMO, is the canon photo paper pro. The red river is pretty good, and the HP just stinks. I guess time will tell--the part about scrapbooking is you really don't want to have to "redo" the page. What I will do from now on, though, is print them out and allow them to dry and then try to scrap them soon after. Thanks again for all the great responses!

Amy
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