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Old Jun 27, 2012, 9:43 PM   #1
crb
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Default photography class or self learning help

Contemplating taking a photography class, but I drive a truck for a livibg. I'm from ohio. Are there any good online classes? How about self teaching Boobs? I take decent photo, but I rely too much on auto settings. I want to take spectator photos. I currently have a Canon T3i with 18;-135 lens. I'm planning to buy additional lenses next year, but I would like to get better with the gear I have. I was thinking a class might help to force me our of my comfort zone.
I'm still a newb basically.
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Old Jun 27, 2012, 10:43 PM   #2
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Consider Canon's own Resources & Learning on-line training materials.
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Old Jun 28, 2012, 5:32 AM   #3
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classes are good to get you to know the basics but a lot of that is available on the web and in magazines. once you you have got the idea of using manual settings then there is no substitute for just taking pictures. you will learn by your successes and failures. with todays modern cameras all the settings used are in the exif data so you look at why it worked or didnt. good luck
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Old Jun 28, 2012, 7:32 AM   #4
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I doubt that anyone would say there is only one way to learn, or to say that you shouldn't try several ways. Figure out what works for you and go with it.

To expand a bit on what wave01 said, the EXIF data embedded in each photo is a great aid in learning. You don't have to take notes on camera settings.

Another good way to learn is to go to art galleries showing photos and try to figure out what makes them worth being there.
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Old Jun 28, 2012, 8:20 AM   #5
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Are you someone who has the self-discipline to take on a learning project on your own and complete it, or do you need the structure of a formal class with teacher?
One really great thing about digital cameras is that you can take many shots of the same scene, using different framing/aperture settings, etc. and not have to pay to have them all developed in order to study the results.

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Old Jun 28, 2012, 12:38 PM   #6
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A good Photography "How to" book goes a long way.....
It's inexpensive,you can pick it up- or put it down- when it suits you- and you can even take it out with you to help you as you go along....
You could even have it alongside you in your truck- reading it whilst having lunch..!
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Old Jun 28, 2012, 2:05 PM   #7
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Take lots of photos. Try different things. Figure out which you like best, and keep doing that.
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Old Jun 28, 2012, 6:30 PM   #8
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G'day crb

Quote:
Originally Posted by crb View Post
Contemplating taking a photography class, but I drive a truck for a living. ...
Driving a camera isn't much different from driving a car ... it helps to have someone who knows more than you to show you enough to get you going, but then it's up to you to keep going & get your skills up via experience

I run photo workshops thru outback eastern Australia, and every weekend workshop I have people who give me feedback via the expression on their face of "hey- I understand that now" ... and when I casually ask for more, it comes out that they have read/heard/been told etc something, but to have it explained and shown in a way that they can immediately understand, makes all the difference

Same as anticipating braking & slowing-down distances on dry/wet roads - gotta be done in person ... you can't get it from just reading or sitting thru an on-line tutorial

Good luck mate > go gettem!
Regards, Phil
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Old Jun 28, 2012, 7:18 PM   #9
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Maybe I should start by re reading the books I have. Stop using auto, and force myself to play with the settings. I need to spend more time behind my camera that's for sure. We are planning a trip to niagra next year so I better find tge time to use the camera more I'd I want good pictures from niagra.

I wull give this a try for a while and see what I can learn on my own.

Thanks for the advice and encouragement.
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Old Jun 29, 2012, 5:25 AM   #10
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Don't worry about trying every possible combination of settings for your camera. Just read the manual (and possibly the on-line stuff on Canon's website) to familiarize yourself with what's possible, and pick some settings that fit your style (once you develop one.)
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