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Old Feb 3, 2004, 6:48 PM   #1
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Default saving as a Tiff, not Jpeg

Currently when I download from my dimage E201 camera it saves all the files as a jpeg, how do I change this to save as a tiff? I simply hook up the usb cable and let windows download the pics into a file. I wish to do this since I have found out about loss and lossless file types. Thanks.
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Old Feb 3, 2004, 6:55 PM   #2
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You have to take the pictures in the first place as a TIFF to download them from the camera as TIFF. TIFF is an impractical format in a camera unless you have a large memory card. Probably about 6.5 Mb per shot with a 2Mp camera compared to well less than a Mb for a best quality JPG. And you will have to probably wait a long time between shots if you use TIFF in the camera.

Download and save them as JPG. All the loss occurred when the camera compressed it to JPG and you gain no advantage converting them to TIFF after the camera outputs JPGs.

If you work on an image in an image editor you should “save as” TIFF to avoid another compression to JPG. Save the original as well.
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Old Feb 3, 2004, 9:27 PM   #3
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well I gave it a try and you were right, it took a long long time to finish recording the image, the size was huge (I could only take 16 pictures with my 128mb card), and it took long to transfer just the single image to the computer. I want to know is the quality really worth it? When is it and when is it not (people or landscape pictures),, also when I look at the properties of the file it says that it is a Microsoft Office Document Imaging File, is this still a TIFF file?
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Old Feb 3, 2004, 9:54 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by destarr
. I want to know is the quality really worth it?
If you plan on printing the picture on paper, the quality is always worth it. If you're just sending pictures over the web to family and friends, probably not.
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Old Feb 4, 2004, 2:10 AM   #5
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I don’t think you would see much difference between a 4 X 6 shot with TIFF or best quality JPG. Even 8 X 10s you would probably be hard pressed to see the difference. I have no idea what quality the best JPG is on that camera, but if they average 7 or 8k they are probably decent.

The really crappy print is of the great picture you miss while waiting for the TIFF to record. My Minolta D7i had a poor buffer and inefficient raw format so there was a 10 second wait for a raw file to record. Even though I liked raw better I often shot in best JPG in dynamic situations to avoid missing so many shots. If I had forever because the scene wasn’t going anywhere I used raw. Even with a quality wide format printer I was hard pressed to see the difference in 13 X 19 prints between JPG and raw – raw actually being superior to TIFF from the camera. I would imagine your wait times for a TIF could be even longer.

And 16 shots on your card is another limitation. Another really crappy print is the one of the great shot you couldn’t take because your card was full. I don’t think TIFF is normally a practical format unless you have a big card and an enormous buffer.
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Old Feb 4, 2004, 5:49 AM   #6
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Picking up on slipe's point, I find multi shot and first or last 5 shot modes really useful. File size and processing times at the moment prevent you using these very useful modes in RAW or TIFF.

Anyway, I've always felt that for average auto shutter speeds (plenty of dull days in UK!), to get the ultimate limit of detail from a camera using TIFFs, you would probably have the camera on a tripod, where you have the time to wait for the buffer to fill/empty.

So I tend to be selective. If my shutter speed is fast enough, or the camera is tripod mounted, the scene is very detailed and arborcultural or landscape and I have plenty of time and memory left - I'd choose TIFF/RAW. VOX
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