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Old Oct 17, 2012, 9:14 AM   #1
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Default Crop factor 1.5X vs 1.6X ??????

On a DSLR, which crop factor is better to have, a crop factor of 1.5X or 1.6X ? Furthermore, I don't even know what the "term crop factor" means or how it relates to image quality or camera performance. Can someone please explain this and tell me which one is better. Thanks.
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Old Oct 17, 2012, 10:21 AM   #2
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There is a sticky thread under General Discussion about Focal Length and Crop Factor, which pretty much explains it.
Since the discussion about it all relate to 35mm, one way to the=ink about it is that the number is how much bigger (or smaller, in some cases) a 35mm frame is. Not enough difference between 1.5x and 1.6x to even consider.

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Old Oct 17, 2012, 10:24 AM   #3
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Crop factor relates to the size of the image sensor compared to the size of a 35mm film exposure (24mm x 36mm), or a 'Full Frame' image sensor. A 1.5X crop factor means the image sensor is roughly 2/3 the size, or that a 'Full Frame' sensor is 1.5X the size of the smaller sensor. A 1.6X crop factor means that a 'Full Frame' sensor is 1.6X the size of the smaller sensor.

There really isn't much difference. Only Canon uses the 1.6X crop factor, presumeably because, in addition to producing dSLRs with 'Full Frame' sensors, it also produces dSLRs with 1.3X crop factor sensors, and 1.5X would just be too close.

The only real difference is that a 1.6X crop factor means that a short focal length lens would not have quite as wide an angle of view as a 1.5X crop factor will have. Conversely, a long focal length lens will have a slightly narrower angle of view on a 1.6X crop factor than it would on a 1.5X crop factor. So the minor differences cancel each other out, and really only matter if you'll only ever do one kind of shooting.
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Old Oct 17, 2012, 2:48 PM   #4
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G'day ss

Simple answer is that a camera with a smaller sensor 'sees' a slightly narrower image than the full-frame 35mm camera would and the resulting image when viewed / printed looks bigger. It's as though you, the user had gone to the print shop and asked for the unwanted stuff around the edge to be removed [ie- cropped] so as to concentrate the eye on the main subject.

maybe something like this ...



So if printed, the bird inside the yellow line now appears 1,5x bigger than it would if the original photo (red line) had been printed

Hope this helps a bit
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Old Oct 17, 2012, 4:08 PM   #5
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Thanks for all the replies. So, it sounds like if one is more concerned with a short focal length lens and does the vast majority of his shots with it and wants a wider view, a camera with a 1.5X crop factor would be a better choice than a camera with a 1.6X crop factor using the same short focal length lens. Is this correct ?
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Old Oct 17, 2012, 5:09 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by surplusshooter View Post
Thanks for all the replies. So, it sounds like if one is more concerned with a short focal length lens and does the vast majority of his shots with it and wants a wider view, a camera with a 1.5X crop factor would be a better choice than a camera with a 1.6X crop factor using the same short focal length lens. Is this correct ?
The difference is very slight, but yes. The Canon EF-S 10-22mm lens has a widest angle of view of 107.5, while the Nikon DX 10-24mm lens has a widest angle of view of 109. The Canon EF-S 15-85 has an angle of view of 18 25' at 85mm, where the Nikon DX 16-85 has an angle of view of 18 50’.

The difference exists, and it may even be noticeable, but it's not like like you could do something with one that you couldn't do with the other.
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Old Oct 18, 2012, 8:43 AM   #7
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There are also 1.7 crop & 4/3 format cameras, just to help confuse things.

If you are interested only in ultra-wide images, a full frame body (no crop factor) and something like the Canon 8-15mm f/4 L fisheye lens or sigma 12-24mm cannot be touched by any of the crop format cameras for field of view.

You can consider the crop factor to be basically a multiplier, that 10mm-22mm lens seems like a 15-33mm on a 1.5 crop body and a 16mm-35.2 on a 1.6 crop body. An virtual 1mm difference at the wide end.

And as Phil showed, the same image view can also be made by cropping out the central area from an image made by a full frame camera with a 15mm or 16mm lens on it.
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Old Oct 18, 2012, 8:52 AM   #8
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Quote:
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There are also 1.7 crop & 4/3 format cameras, just to help confuse things.
Yeah. Thanks for that.
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Old Oct 18, 2012, 12:02 PM   #9
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The difference between 1.5 and 1.6 is not really worth talking about- and certainly has no bearing on IQ or performance of a given camera.
If you're after a given wide angle- basically select an appropriate lens...
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Old Oct 18, 2012, 12:48 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SIMON40 View Post
The difference between 1.5 and 1.6 is not really worth talking about- and certainly has no bearing on IQ or performance of a given camera.
If you're after a given wide angle- basically select an appropriate lens...
Agreed. The difference between the field of view with the same focal length lens on a 1.6x and 1.5x crop camera is probably about a footstep backwards (or forwards). Not something I would even worry about if trying to decide on a dSLR. I'd be more worried about the specs that have an affect on IQ, speed, etc.
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