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Old Feb 24, 2004, 8:50 AM   #11
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Hum, I reread those threads and I don't think this was mentioned in any of them.

I'd say the best way to get in to the nutty world of being a wedding shooter is to start by working on portrature, taking classes or whatever and building up your book.
When you finally think your book is up to scratch and is ready shop it around to the local studios and wedding shooters and try to get on as an assistant.
From assisting you will get the hows and whys of what goes on, and eventually start taking actual pictures usually the candids.
When the lead shooter thinks you are ready they may let you take over on some shoots.

Real Wedding photography is major big business with fees running into the thousands, and the apprentice system is alive and works quite well for it.

Of course there is also the trailer park version where someone come in for 100$ shoots a few rolls of film and gives the unprocessed rolls to the victims.
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Old Feb 24, 2004, 11:32 AM   #12
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PeterP

You are right, I've never heard someone here suggest that route. I'm happy to hear that it still works that way. I certainly wouldn't want to dive into wedding photography without first seeing and studying how it's done.

carlos74
It's all right, it's just frustrating because I've written so much about it (and we've seen that question about... 5 times in the last 5 months) that I knew the exact answer to your question was there already. Many people don't use the search (including me some times) so it happens. Just have a good attitude and post/answer questions and you'll fit right in.

Eric
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Old Feb 24, 2004, 2:07 PM   #13
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No problem Eric, I really appreciate taking your time and telling newbie's like me how important it is to be 100% ready before starting shooting weddings. I never took your comments negatively. Well at first I did, but after reading your links, all I can say is: Thanks, Thanks, Thanks !
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Old Feb 24, 2004, 7:43 PM   #14
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I've always wondered about this whenever I see it posted - re: how difficult it is to be a wedding photog.

It surprises me somewhat, because when I was young my mum worked as a wedding photog. She came into that line of work being employed by a pro photog who hired her as a bookeeper/secretary/personal admin/studio manager initially. She had previously had no training or qualifications in the field of photography. Yet this on the job training was all she needed to become one. She eventually build up a reputation for herself that people were approaching the company specifically asking for her to cover their weddings. I could never understand why people were willing to pay so much for such a simple task of taking photos at an event!

It was weird for me since because her equipment costed so much, I was never allowed to touch them as a kid, and consequently never learned to load film into a camera until the age of 17! But since then, I've worked on occasions as her assistant and as assistant to other photogs - and I do realise the stresses and time constraints of the job. They have to be as inconspicuous as possible, and it's absolutely essential they rely on their equipment 100%, which for me explains why there's sometimes such strong opinions from both the Canon and Nikon camps. 1 failure could become a huge inconvenience, and if it weren't for the redundancy of equipment it could well be a disaster.

In summary, I don't believe there are hard and fast rules about breaking into the "industry" of wedding photography, but as with all career options - it's pretty much who you know, not what you know.
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Old Feb 24, 2004, 7:58 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterP
Of course there is also the trailer park version where someone come in for 100$ shoots a few rolls of film and gives the unprocessed rolls to the victims.
Hey I resemble that remark!

Actually we prefer the term "Manufactured Housing Community"
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Old Feb 24, 2004, 9:10 PM   #16
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Sounds like she fell into it through the apprentice method
Most pros used to use only medirm format for weddings but the high rez dslr like the 1ds seem to be changing that quickly

Knowing people does help get breaks, but the talent has to be there or things won't pan out.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Onyx
In summary, I don't believe there are hard and fast rules about breaking into the "industry" of wedding photography, but as with all career options - it's pretty much who you know, not what you know.
Mr_Saginaw:
In the summer so do I, spend a lot of time in a trialer park in a 35 foot, leaky aluminum box(er trailer). Stopped trying to use it in the winter when the furnace kept burning out.
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