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Old Feb 29, 2004, 3:10 AM   #11
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I've tried different settings and there is too much light.

Well this is what effect I wanted during the day. http://www.shortcourses.com/using/sh...s/chapter2.htm
the waterfall.
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Old Feb 29, 2004, 5:50 AM   #12
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Default 1. Use ND filters or go back to film...

Quote:
Originally Posted by magyar
I've tried different settings and there is too much light
You've got too much light because the f/8 minimum aperture is normal for digicams, which is too wide for long shutter speeds in ordinary lighting conditions at normal sensor sensitivities. Digicam optics are scaled down to the size of the CCD sensor, relative to...

..the 24x36mm of 35mm film cameras, where the mimum aperture would commonly be f/16 or f/22 or f/32 (1/16th as much light as f/8 ...)

...or the 60x60mm of roll film cameras, where f/32 or f/45 would be normal minimum, or even smaller holes for 5x4 or 10x8 sheet film or plate cameras.

To cut down the light you need neutral density filters. To see whether it's worth spending lots of money on high quality ones, try taking a few shots through half of a dark pair of sunglasses, or even a couple of pairs of sunglasses. If they're polaroid sunglasses, you can rotate them relative to one another and get variable transmission from partly polarising reflective subjects.

Alternatively, go back to a film camera, for which there are still plenty of applications, tiny apertures, and very slow films available.
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Old Feb 29, 2004, 6:00 AM   #13
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Default ...OR try multiple exposures

Quote:
Originally Posted by magyar
I've tried different settings and there is too much light
If you have your camera securely mounted on a tripod, pointing at the waterfall, try taking many images and then blending them in your image editor. The bits that aren't the waterfall should be identical, and all the moving bits will be different. If you blend the right proportions of each you might get the effect you want.

You'll have to experiment with the exposures, but that costs nothing but time and battery power with a digicam.

I get this when I don't want it, when I take panoramas and the sky contains moving clouds or waving foliage. The clouds & trees are nicely smeared in the overlaps, when I don't want them to be.
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