Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > Newbie Help

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Feb 12, 2016, 2:02 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 26
Default ADD ON Macro/telephoto lenses

Hi, I see I can purchase very basic Macro/2x telephoto/Wide angle - lenses. correct me if im wrong I believe they just screw into my current 18-55mm zoom lens. Are these decent to use? Also I have a 75-300mm lens would adding the 2x telephoto be a good idea and increase range (barring the camera shake factor)?
Attached Images
 
funbug is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Feb 12, 2016, 3:23 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,572
Default

No. The conversion lenses that attach to the end of the camera via in the filter mounting screw threads, are not a good idea.
  • They're mostly intended for use on camcorders and P&S cameras, so the optical quality isn't very good.
  • Some are heavy, as in, heavier than the filter mounting screw threads were designed to hold.
  • Many consist of uncoated optics which reduce contrast and light transmission, lowing overall image quality.
If you want to increase the zoom range of your 75-300 telephoto zoom lens, a teleconverter (that mounts between the lens and the camera body)will work better than a conversion lens. The optics are higher quality and the lens mount is better able to handle the extra bulk. But a 2X teleconverter will add two f-stops to the maximum aperture of the lens (f/5.6 becomes f/11) which can interfere with your camera's ability to autofocus.

In general, inexpensive ways to do something that generally only has expensive solutions, are not usually good choices. If you need good close-up images, get a macro lens for your interchangeable lens camera (which is possibly the reason you got an interchangeable lens camera in the first place.) If you need a lens with a longer focal length, get a lens with a longer focal length.
__________________
  • The lens is the thing.
  • 'Full Frame' is the new 'Medium Format'.
  • "One good test is worth a thousand expert opinions." - Tex Johnston, Boeing 707 test pilot.
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 12, 2016, 4:48 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
VTphotog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Extreme Northeastern Vermont, USA
Posts: 4,231
Default

Yeah, pretty much what TCav said, with the exception that some of the teleconverters made by camera manufacturers were of excellent optical quality. Olympus, Minolta, Sony, Nikon, and Canon all made add-on lenses that were very good.
Some (probably most) will cause vignetting at any but the longest telephoto setting of a zoom lens.
The advantages of these kind of lenses are that you don't have to remove your lens from the camera, which helps keep dust out of the camera, and that the lower magnification teleconverters (up to about 2X), don't lose you any light, as the objectives are enough larger to compensate for the increased magnification. (but add a good bit of weight)
If you do decide to buy one, get a good one, which won't be cheap.
VTphotog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 13, 2016, 4:43 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
kazuya's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 1,007
Default

just to add to what the others guys have said, as far as macro goes you can buy extension tubes that are a quite a cheap option for macro work, and because they don't have any glass in them you get better quality than lenses like the one you mentioned.
kazuya is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 13, 2016, 12:18 PM   #5
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 26
Default

Thanks for all the responses guys, I'm been shooting general pictures for a bit and wanted to branch into a little bit more artsy for fun...I am definitely on a budget which made these lenses very attractive at $15-$20 on ebay...However wanted to get some knowledge about these things before hand. I think Ill look elsewhere and find some deals on the more quality lenses. Thanks again.
funbug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 13, 2016, 7:58 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,572
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by funbug View Post
... at $15-$20 on ebay. ...
Steer clear.
__________________
  • The lens is the thing.
  • 'Full Frame' is the new 'Medium Format'.
  • "One good test is worth a thousand expert opinions." - Tex Johnston, Boeing 707 test pilot.
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 13, 2016, 8:02 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,572
Default

BTW, kazuya's suggestion about the extension tubes is a good one, but they magnify the flaws in the lenses that you use them with, and I'd hesitate to you them with the two lenses you've mentioned. They generally work best with fast primes like a 50/1.7.
__________________
  • The lens is the thing.
  • 'Full Frame' is the new 'Medium Format'.
  • "One good test is worth a thousand expert opinions." - Tex Johnston, Boeing 707 test pilot.
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 26, 2016, 12:50 PM   #8
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 26
Default

Thank TCav, I hear what everyone is saying, Im keeping an eye out for the good lens. in the mean time I ordered a reversing ring cheap on ebay to do some indoor stuff and play around with a few ideas...and wait for a good macro lens.
funbug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 26, 2016, 4:27 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Australia, New South Wales central coast
Posts: 2,907
Default

G'day mate

May I add to the info the fellas above have already offered, as well as some examples

As to 'decent' quality add-on converter lenses for fixed-lens cameras or budget-priced SLRs ... yes they are around, but you will need to pay $200 each for a decent one. If you have an SLR then - as mentioned above - it's better to buy a proper lens designed for the SLR

However, if you're like me and enjoy the fixed-lens superzoom style of camera, then you are left with these add-on lenses ... of which I have several

Firstly- let's look an an evil-bay cheapie - the sort of thing you are referring to. The lens is branded 'professional quality 2x converter'

1) camera image


2) adapter lens added


I could also post wide-angle adapter shots as well, but I think you get the idea

However, if you wish to pay $200+/- for a brand-name adapter ... Kodak if you can find any, or canon or panasonic you can get a good lens

As to 'macro' stuff, the fellas above suggest extension tubes and this is a good suggestion. Again however, you do have options as well

I use "+2 & +3 dioptre close up lenses" onto my 75-300 big lens [sigma onto the pentax] as well as onto the 14x zoom on the panasonic or fuji superzooms, to bring the focus point down to 12-18inches, while still having full use of the zoom

Here's a sample



This is a Nephila [golden orb] spider female & male in the background, taken thru the web from about 15" away.

and here's a 100% crop from the centre of the above image


You can see the sort of sharpness you can get using the close up lens on the front of your big zoom lens ... tripod essential btw


You can buy a Hoya close up lens [sometimes incorrectly called a close-up filter as it screws onto the filter ring] - for about $50+/-, or you can buy a 'real-good' one from canon or panasonic for about $120

The 'real-good' ones are made from 2 pieces of glass [ie 2-elements] and give better edge-to-edge sharpness

The beaut thing about using a close-up lens is
a) the power of the lens [ie the +2 or +3 bit] determines the lens-to-subject distance, with +3 focussing at 1/3 of a metre, and then you use the zoom to bring the image to the size you want


Enjoy your photos
Hope this helps
Phil
__________________
Has Fuji & Lumix superzoom cameras and loves their amazing capabilities
Spends 8-9 months each year travelling Australia
Recent images at http://www.flickr.com/photos/ozzie_traveller/sets/

Last edited by Ozzie_Traveller; Feb 26, 2016 at 4:29 PM.
Ozzie_Traveller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 26, 2016, 9:41 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 297
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by funbug View Post
Thank TCav, I hear what everyone is saying, Im keeping an eye out for the good lens. in the mean time I ordered a reversing ring cheap on ebay to do some indoor stuff and play around with a few ideas...and wait for a good macro lens.
Are you sure you understand how this works?

If you reverse mount an AF zoom lens on the camera body, you can lose the ability to change the aperture and possibly the manual focus. Reversing a lens is usually done with an old manual focus prime with an aperture ring. You can also reverse that prime face to face with the kit lens as a diopter if you wanted to.

I think what you need is a set of AF extension tubes that would work with either of your lenses as well as a macro lens. You don't have to use them fully stacked. Just a single spacer would get you into macro range and give you a good sense of how macro works.

For subjects like flowers or small nature subjects, that might be all you ever need. If you do insects, you'll want the extension tubes to get beyond 1:1 with a macro lens anyway.

The nice thing about the AF extension tubes is that they work with any lens that fits the camera. Keep in mind that the better macro images are almost always using a speedlite and diffuser. That's why some of these oddball combinations work so well. It's due to the flash.
BBbuilder467 is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 4:35 AM.