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Old Mar 9, 2004, 9:23 PM   #1
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Default Overexposure

Hello. I just got me a new Canon A80 and very pleased I am with it too. Just a quick question (I hope): I went out shooting earlier to practise - I'm new to all this manual control business; I took a few shots next to a busy road, I wanted to see if I could blur the cars in motion. However, if I set the shutter speed slow enough to do this, even the smallest aperture (f8 on this cam) let in way too much light and the shot was overexposed. I've tried using low ISO settings, chainging the exposure compensation etc but to no avail. How do I get a properly exposed shot with slow shutter speeds in daylight?
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Old Mar 9, 2004, 10:04 PM   #2
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Put your camera in Tv (shutter priority) mode. This mode allows you to select the shutter speed you want and the camera will select the correct aperture.

If you want to do it in manual, you need to adjust your shutter speed and aperture to the proper exposure for the given light. You'll need to use your camera's exposure meter and adjust your settings until they meter indicates proper exposure.

EDIT: I misread your message. Didn't see that f/8 was your smallest aperture.
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Old Mar 10, 2004, 11:02 AM   #3
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Default Re: Overexposure

Quote:
Originally Posted by paintnothing
How do I get a properly exposed shot with slow shutter speeds in daylight?
This is the exact application for neutral density filters. I'm not sure if your A80 can take filters, but if it can, look to pick up an ND4 (2 stop) or ND8 (3 stop) ND filter. They cut the amount of light getting into the lens to allow slow shutters in bright conditions--for things like waterfalls, rivers, traffic, etc..
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Old Mar 10, 2004, 1:27 PM   #4
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OK cool, thanks for the help. The A80 can take filters once you buy a 52mm adapter for it, so I'll look into that at some point once my wallet has recovered from purchasing the cam.
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Old Mar 10, 2004, 4:46 PM   #5
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Try holding sunglasses in front of your lens. Likely you will have all kinds of nasty optical effects (flare, distortion, vignetting ...) but might be good enough for you to figure out if the motion effect you are looking for works the way you want. If it does, by metering with your camera through the sunglasses you should be able to get an idea of how dense a filter you need.

Watch out for polarized sunglasses - that is a different effect. A good one to experiment with, but different.
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Old Mar 10, 2004, 8:05 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillDrew
Try holding sunglasses in front of your lens. Likely you will have all kinds of nasty optical effects (flare, distortion, vignetting ...) but might be good enough for you to figure out if the motion effect you are looking for works the way you want. If it does, by metering with your camera through the sunglasses you should be able to get an idea of how dense a filter you need.

Watch out for polarized sunglasses - that is a different effect. A good one to experiment with, but different.
Yep - I used to do that many years ago with an SLR but now we have rotating polarising filters - problem is that with my digital camera the EVF doesn't preview the effect very well so I have to 'bracket' the effect but it's worth it in very bright conditions
to get rid of abberations & reflections from water or to deepen a sky.

Chris
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Old Mar 11, 2004, 8:00 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tik
Yep - I used to do that many years ago with an SLR but now we have rotating polarising filters - problem is that with my digital camera the EVF doesn't preview the effect very well so I have to 'bracket' the effect but it's worth it in very bright conditions
to get rid of abberations & reflections from water or to deepen a sky.
We always had rotating polarized filters. The Minolta rotating polarizer I use on my D7i was originally bought for my SRT-101 about 35 years ago.

The effect on the camera is exactly the same as the effect to your eye. Tilt your head until the scene looks best and hold the glasses at the same angle over the lens. Sunglasses are horizontally polarized to reduce reflections from roads, water etc. That seems to be fairly close to optimum for most things so you donít usually have to tilt your head over to ninety degrees very often.
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