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Old Mar 26, 2004, 4:13 AM   #1
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Default Need help in choosing a digital camera

Hi...
This will be my first digital camera.
Heres what I want it to have:
-I want it to easly slip into my pocket.(Ultracompact)
-I would prefer if it has 4-5 Mega pixels - not very important as long as it capture very high quality images.(very important)
-I want it to capture good quality videoclips, I would prefer if it have unlimeted recording.
-I wouldnít mind if the price goes to $550.
-I would prefer a big LCD.

I found these :
Casio Z40
Canon S500/S400
Pentax S4i
Sony T1

So any recomandations? :roll: Any others to consider :?:

Thanks in advance.
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Old Mar 26, 2004, 8:38 PM   #2
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any1??? :?:
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Old Mar 26, 2004, 8:59 PM   #3
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I donít have the insights you probably want, but I donít want you to feel ignored.

I have a Pentax S4. They are a bargain right now with the S4i just about to come on the market. You can get one for $290 delivered and with the $30 rebate the camera comes in at $260. I have been pleased with the quality. It has a true SHQ JPG compression putting out 2.7Mb average files at very nice quality. It is very easy to carry. The S4i has a larger LCD and a docking cradle. Other enhancements are mostly gee-haw modes.

I wouldnít personally touch a T1 unless I was primarily interested in the movies Ė it takes very nice movies. But it has no viewfinder other than the LCD. It is hard to steady the camera properly with the LCD and I just personally donít like that.

I would buy a Minolta G500 before the S400. It is less expensive and has more features in a 5Mp camera. I donít know enough about the S500 to comment, but it should be a nice camera albeit pricey.

I havenít read any reviews of the Z40. I think it is an upgraded Z4. The Z4 has the same Pentax lens as the S4/S4i. I think the Z40 does also. The cameras are a little larger than the Pentax counterparts but have a nice 2 inch LCD. The S4 is more versatile than the Z4.
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Old Mar 26, 2004, 10:38 PM   #4
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Thanks!
Its really polite of you to reply....ya I felt ignored for once...I saw lots of views but no replys.

back to the topic. the g500 is realy god. but I find it alittel thick and I think it wont look good in my jeans pocket :roll:
the thing that lets me go towards the sony T1 is the ability to record movies at 640x320 with 30fps...which is really great. Also I own sonyericsson p900 which has Memmory stick duo..and I already have a 128 MB.
The great thing about s4i and z4 is that both are really thin and small, they have movie mode which is unlimeted but they are qt 15fps. Also they have SD which is cheap and my laptop has a SD slot. S4i might be smaller but as you said the z4 has a bigger screen.
Im really not into canon s400 and s500 but the thing that makes me look at it is that many say that it is good and its one of the best sellers....

Also I want to know whats the difference between Z4u and Z40 I know that the Z4U does not record clips but I also heard that its for the US market, I currentl live in the US so can I get the Z40??

So I'm all around not sure what to get. But what i really want to know is which one of these (canon s400/s500, z40,s4i, T1) have the best quality, and is it noticable?
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Old Mar 27, 2004, 5:05 AM   #5
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btw could I use any of the above as a webcam in msn messenger?
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Old Mar 27, 2004, 8:19 AM   #6
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Have you read Steve's reviews on the camera's you have selected? Because many people have brand loyalties, including myself, in all reality, you are probably better off reading about each as much as you can and Steve's is an excellent place. After that, I'd go to the camera store and try each one out as much as you can. If you have a strong gut for one, buy it from a store with a good return policy so you can try it out under a variety of situations. I just bought a Nikon D70 and that's exactly what I did. Unfortunately it wasn't released when I decided to buy it, so I didn't hold it prior to buying, but I made sure I followed the vendors rules so I could return it if I didn't like it. So far it's working out well. I've have it a week and love it so far. I'd give you further advice, but I have little experience with smaller camera's.

Good luck on your camera search. I know exactly how hard and confusing it can get!
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Old Mar 27, 2004, 5:02 PM   #7
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Ya, I read steves' reviews about these cameras before I posted this topic, not just steve's I read many reviews,but as you said its hard, I never bought a digital camera, so really I know nothin' about it, but I'm trying to learn.
About trying it, I will be buying the digital camera from the internet, becasue I just came to the US, I dont know any place :S so its kinda hard, I went to best buy but they dont have all the cameras I posted....
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Old Mar 27, 2004, 5:55 PM   #8
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hmm, I wish I could help further, but I just don't know much about the smaller guys. I can understand what you mean about buying on the internet because my local stores don't always have what I want.

I still stand by this though. As much as possible, try to play with numerous different camera's prior to buying to get a good idea for what you are looking for. When I bought my first digicam, I was new to digital like yourself. I read the reviews, the pros and cons, etc and then I bought one that I thought would fit the bill. Well, when it arrived I did like it and it did take good pictures, but over time I found I had not put enough consideration into shutter lag, start up time, how powerful the flash was and so here I am a year latter much wiser (I hope) just having bought a new camera again. It's easy to over look some points that you did not consider important. Had I played with them more prior to buying I may not be buying only 1 year later. But for me, it actually worked great; I sold my old camera at only a $200 loss ($500 new) and I've bought this Nikon D70 I just love so far.

Once again, good luck. Don't give up looking. I hope others with more knowledge on the cameras you are looking at help out.
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Old Mar 27, 2004, 9:52 PM   #9
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Thanks for the Tips! I new that these numbers meant somthin' :lol: .... btw can u tell me whats better...i mean which is better to have a low shutter lag or high?and other stuff like the lens...and mmm stuff like this ...if you can
thanks again
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Old Mar 27, 2004, 10:46 PM   #10
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If you take action shots, its better to have a short shutter lag and a quick startup time.

The higher the x number on the zoom, the stronger the zoom is. If you anticipate taking maybe wild life shots or maybe race track shots, then look for a good zoom, but don't forget the need for wide. It's nice to be able to go wide for taking pictures in small rooms for instance.

My old camera was a 3x zoom and it did fine most of the time for me because I shoot mostly family shots.

I don't think most if any camera's can act as webcams, but I could be wrong on this.

Pay attention to how well the camera can focus, especially in low light. My old camera couldn't focus very well in low light and many digicams share this same problem.

One other thing to thing about. A small camera could mean a weak flash and you'll most likely get a good bit of red eye in your people shots at night. The further the flash is away fron the lens, the less likely you'll have red eye. There are of course other ways to reduce or eliminate red eye such as red eye modes in the camera.
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