Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > Newbie Help

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jul 5, 2004, 11:16 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 38
Default

A Canon S1 IS w/ 10X zoom has a 35 mm equalivant of 38 to 380.

The digtal rebal with two lenes has a range of 18-200. Lens EF 18 to 55 and lens EF 55 to 200. Better wide angle but less telephoto.

With the exception of resolution, I don't see the hype over the Digtal Rebel.

Are the lenes that superior ?

Will the extra shutter speed 1/2000 vs 1/4000 help for daylight sporting events or is this just needed for e.g. fireworks.

I assume some day there will be an equavilant to the S1 IS with a 6 mp senser. If that existed today would there still be hype over the digtal rebel.
obrien040362 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jul 6, 2004, 2:27 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Mikefellh's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Toronto, ON, Canada
Posts: 1,707
Default

The primary ability is being able to change the lens...if you wanted to go wider or closer with the S1 you have to add a converter lens to the end (provided the S1 can have filters/lenses added)...here's a sample with the Pro90IS:
http://www.raynox.co.jp/english/digital/egcanon90is.htm

The biggest advantages though of SLR cameras are larger CCDs (which mean less noise), faster processing (like for sports photography), and better quality images.
Mikefellh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 6, 2004, 7:28 AM   #3
VC
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 22
Default

Just a quick note, be sure to take into account the cropping factor when looking at focal lengths of dSLR lenses. The Digital Rebel has a cropping factor of 1.6x, I believe, so that 18-55mm lens is actually 29-88mm, and the 55-200mm is actually 88-320mm. The cropping factor is a result of the size difference between the digital sensor and film size of a traditional camera.

The S1 IS is a good camera. It has a long zoom, is small and portable, and has image stabilization built in. In order to get the same zoom range on a dRebel, you'll need at least the two lenses you mentioned. The lenses also won't have image stabilization like the S1, but the the better sensor in the dRebel will allow you to take pictures at higher ISO settings (light sensitivity) with less noise, which will give you the ability to shoot at faster shutter speeds under the same light conditions, somewhat negating the difference IS will make. You can buy much better lenses for a dRebel than the one lens you'd have on the S1, but you'll spend a small fortune on glass.

Bottom line, the dRebel is a very good camera, but is a much bigger investment. The S1 IS will give you a very good camera for a very good price, but you may find that you "outgrow" it over time. If you're new to photography and unsure how much of an investment in equipment you want to make, I'd suggest going with the S1 IS. If you've been around photography, are familiar already with manual settings on a camera and want to ensure you have complete control over the images you take, geta dSLR. Both are excellent cameras, it just depends how they suit you.

VC
VC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 6, 2004, 10:21 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Indian Rocks Beach, FL
Posts: 4,036
Default


The big difference is lower noise, better dynamic range, faster response and twice the pixels on the Rebel. You can also manually focus a lot better with the Rebel because of the better detail in the viewfinder. And you can blur the background better. If they put the sensor from the Rebel in a prosumer 10X zoom camera it would be enormous.

But I don't know of anything you can do in the way of settings on the Rebel you can't do with the S1. It has the full range of manual controls. Might be a good place to start with digital photography. Also consider the Panasonic FZ10. The images from either don't compare with a DSLR, but you can get some nice pictures from them.
slipe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 6, 2004, 10:30 AM   #5
VC
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 22
Default

slipe wrote:
Quote:

The big difference is lower noise, better dynamic range, faster response and twice the pixels on the Rebel. You can also manually focus a lot better with the Rebel because of the better detail in the viewfinder. And you can blur the background better. If they put the sensor from the Rebel in a prosumer 10X zoom camera it would be enormous.

But I don't know of anything you can do in the way of settings on the Rebel you can't do with the S1. It has the full range of manual controls. Might be a good place to start with digital photography. Also consider the Panasonic FZ10. The images from either don't compare with a DSLR, but you can get some nice pictures from them.

Yes, I can't believe I didn't mention the FZ10. Both the Canon and the Panasonic are excellent cameras,so have a look at both in person before buying either. Also,be sure to check out the reviews here at www.steves-digicams.comand at www.dcresource.com of any camera you're considering.

VC
VC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 6, 2004, 10:32 AM   #6
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

Pros and Cons: Digital SLR versus Non-DSLR Models

LCD Framing: unlike a consumer (or "prosumer") camera, the LCD can't be used for framing on a DSLR.

Lens Cost: To get the same focal range you can find in a consumer level (non-DSLR) camera, you often have to spend much more money, especially to get lenses that are as "fast" (widest apertures available at wide angle and zoom). To get all the features (macro performance, zoom range, etc.), you must often purchase more than one lens, too.

Camera Size/Weight: Because of the larger sensors used in most Digital SLR cameras, the lenses also have to be larger and heavier for the same focal ranges/light gathering ability.

Sensor Cleaning: When you swap lenses, you risk dust getting into the the sensor.

Features: you often don't get the "bells, whistles and buzzers" found on a consumer model in a DSLR (i.e., sound recording, panaroma modes, movie modes, etc.).

A Few Advantages to a Digital SLR:

A true "Through the Lens Optical Viewfinder"

Better Dynamic Range -- again, this is mostly due to the much larger sensor being used.

Ability to Shoot at Higher ISO speeds with lower noise. DSLR's have much larger sensors, with better signal to noise ratios as CCD sensitivity is amplifed for higher ISO speeds. Often, a DSLR is the only tool that will work well for indoor sports, and other conditions requiring the ability to shoot at higher ISO speeds.Some of these models allow useable prints at up to ISO 1600 (allowing shutter speeds up to 16 times as fast as ISO 100, for the same aperture and lighting).

Fast Focus Speeds -- Most Digital SLR's use a Phase Detection Focus System which is extremely fast. Most Consumer Grade Cameras use a Contrast Detection Focus System.

Ability to Control Depth of Field - The smaller sensors used in a Consumer Grade Camera limit your ability to control Depth of Field (blur backgrounds by using wider apertures). This is because Depth of Field is based on the Actual (versus 35mm) equivalent focal length of the lens (and a much shorter focal length lens can be used on a consumer model, to get the same equivalent focal length in a DSLR).

Of course, some users may not care about blurring backgrounds for effect, and may like the greater DOF (more of a photo in focus) a non-DSLR camera would have at a given 35mm equivalent focal length/aperture/focus distance, too. So, depending on your perspective, this could be looked at as an advantage, or a disadvantage to a DSLR.

Lenses become an investment - With a Digital SLR, when you upgrade your camera body later, you can take your lenses with you within the same manufacturer. With a consumer grade camera, the lenses are permanently attached.

Speed of Writes - The processors used in most Digital SLR's are faster than the processors used in consumer grade cameras. As a result the camera's overall operation is usually much faster.

A few other comments:

Both types of cameras can be great for many users. Some users have both (a compact consumer model good for most shooting situations, that is much easier to carry); as well as a Digital SLR (with multiple lenses) for special purpose applications.

There are pros and cons to both approaches.


JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 6, 2004, 11:57 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 269
Default

Others have done a fine job explaining the differences, especially JimC. In regards to shutter speed, I don't think I've done pics yet with shutter speed higher than 1/1000, and I do a lot of auto racing pics including Champ Cars. And for something like fireworks, you actually want a much slower (not faster) shutter speed.

Whether you need a DSLR or not depends largely on what you use will be. I got a Minolta Z1 earlier this year because film costs were killing me. I needed a fairly cheap, fastdigital with good zoom. Not long after getting that camera, I came across more funds and I realized I was up against the Z1's limitation when doing sports, especially night racing. I took the plunge and got a D70. I'm glad I did. Here's some pics I got a couple of weeks ago, my first weekend of racing shooting with the D70:

http://www.brownfieldent.com/GHR/04Craig's1.htm
murphyc is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 9:53 AM.