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Old Jul 28, 2004, 12:09 AM   #11
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You may want to try using +EV for this type of shot, if they are coming out consistently underexposed indoors (perhaps around +0.9 or so)

Although, it's always better to have them a little underexposed, versus overexposed (otherwise, you risk blowing the highlights).

Instead of a +EV adjustment, I'd probably try spot metering first. Just make sure you've got the camera set to a center focus point (in case spot metering is tied into your focus). You'll see both of these selections in your record menus (just change Focus to Center, and changeMetering to Spot).

Then, aim at something in your mural that's about mid-range in brightness. Press the shutter button down half way to lock in focus and meteringon the selected point in the mural, thenreframe your image in the viewfinder for composition, and press the shutter button the rest of the way downto take the photo.

I had a little Sony DSC-P10 briefly last year, and I found that it had a tendency to underexpose a lot of indoor shots. Using spot metering pretty much solved it.

It doesn't look like the P92 hasa custom white balance setting (which could help some, too if part of the problem was just the mixed lighting).

You'll need to practice with it, learning it's behavior, so you'll know if you need to use one of these techniques for all of your indoor shots with it (or only in some conditions -- like the mixed lighting you indicated you had in this one).

Some of the guys here could probably offer some tips on sprucingup your indoor photos with an image editor, if they all come out about the same.This was just a quick white point adjustment:

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Old Jul 28, 2004, 10:52 AM   #12
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Thank you! I changed the metering and focus. I also changed the EV to 1.0...it's either that or 0.7. I'm also going to try pushing half way for a few secconds, and then taking the pic.


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Old Jul 28, 2004, 11:07 AM   #13
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mypalette wrote:
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Thank you! I changed the metering and focus. I also changed the EV to 1.0...it's either that or 0.7. I'm also going to try pushing half way for a few secconds, and then taking the pic.

You probably won't need to do both (+EV and spot metering) -- based on my short term use of a DSC-P10 (which is a similiar camera). If the photos are consistently underexposed indoors, then just using +EV compensation will probably "do the trick" and be much easier.

In contrast, using spot meteringtakes some practice. The key is to make sure you're metering on something that is mid-range in brightness. For example: if you meter on a portion of the image that is darker, then the camera's autoexposure algorithms will attempt to correctly expose that point of the image. Since it's darker, the other portions of the image could end up being too bright.

Or, if you meter on a brighter portion of an image (for example, a portion containing white), then the rest of the image may be a little too dark.

The greater the difference in brightness between different parts of an image, the more difficult correctly metering it will become. In your example, I don't think that there is enough difference to worry about it too much. I suspect that the camera's matrix metering mode (taking metering samples from all of the frame, versus a small portion of it), are just leaning towards underexposure indoors.

I found this to be the case with a Sony DSC-P10 I owned briefly.Different cameras tend to behave in different ways.

Again, I'd practice using these features on your camera, so that you have a better understanding of it's behavior in different conditions. Then, you'll know what techniques to use for the best results -- learning to take advantage of it's strengths, and working around it's limitations.

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Old Jul 28, 2004, 11:10 AM   #14
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so I should keep the metering mode at "multi"?
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Old Jul 28, 2004, 11:14 AM   #15
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mypalette wrote:
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so I should keep the metering mode at "multi"?
Try it both ways, to see what works best foryou. Also, I was editing my last post at the same time you were typing yours, so read it again for any additional info I added about using these modes.




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Old Jul 28, 2004, 11:50 AM   #16
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One more comment. Take more than one photo using different settings for these types of images. It doen't cost you a thing (no developing cost, printing cost, etc.).

Then, look at them later, to learn the impact that the different settings have on images taken in the same conditions.

It takes practice to learn how to use your camera's feaures (different metering modes, EV Compensation, etc.). None of them work perfectly in all conditions without some user input.




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Old Jul 30, 2004, 4:25 PM   #17
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I have another question...I print mostly 8 x 10's. A lot of my photos look great at the small size, but look less...well, "clear" when they're printed at the larger sizes. Is this because of a problem that I'm unknowingly doinf?
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Old Jul 30, 2004, 4:44 PM   #18
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Well, any defects in a photo will show up at larger print sizes.

I'd make sure you have your camera set to it's highest resolution for"Image Size" (5MP). I'd also make sure you have "Quality" set to Fine. I didn't say anything, but I also noticed some noise in your photo when I looked at it. This is because you probably have it set to Auto ISO.

This means that the camera is increasing the sensitivity of the CCD to light indoors by increasing the ISO Speed. You will get more noise (similar to film grain) at higher ISO Speeds. So, I would set ISO Speed to 100 versus Auto. You'll see these choices under the Record Menu. Your flash range will not be as great at ISO 100, but as long as you are relatively close to your subject, it will produce "cleaner" photos.

You may also want to use an Image Editor to sharpen your photos slightly before printing. However, be careful not to sharpen them too much (as this can make them look worse).

Printer Type can also come into play. Most Inkjet Printers will print very nice 8x10" prints from a 5 Megapixel Image (or even a 3 Megapixel Image). However, some other printer types may require interpolation of an image to a higher PPI count (pixels per inch).

If you're using an Inkjet, make sure it's set to it's highest quality mode, and that you are using very good quality photo paper. The paper type can make a HUGE difference, and will usually have to bematched well to your printer. For example, Kodak Paper may work terrible in a Canon printer -- depending on the model.

Added: What printer and paper are you using?

BTW, don't let anything you don't understand worry you (interpolation, sharpening, etc.).You probably don't even need to worry about these things. If you do, there are free programs that you can do these types of things via simple menu choices, and we can steer you in the right direction.

Let us know more about your printer, paper, etc., and I'm sure the members here can offer some tips.

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Old Jul 30, 2004, 9:14 PM   #19
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mypalette wrote:
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... A lot of my photos look great at the small size, but look less...well, "clear" when they're printed at the larger sizes. Is this because of a problem that I'm unknowingly doinf?
The first thing to do is make sure your camera is absolutely still, i.e., get a tripod. Then shoot using either a remote shutter release or the self timer so you do not move the camera when tripping the shutter.

Get a EXIF reader that matches your camera (ask in the Sony forum). That will mean that you can experiment and be able to see what shutter speed you used, EV bias settings, color balance, saturation, ... Try a lot of things and look at the EXIF info for ones that work out the best and worst. You will learn a lot real quick.
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Old Jul 30, 2004, 9:29 PM   #20
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Bill is correct. Sometimes things like a slow shutter speed can cause a photo to look fine at smaller sizes, but blurry at larger sizes.

Looking at the image you posted a link toearlier at 100% size, I don't see any signs of this, so I was assuming that it's probably related to your printing process.

I didn't occur to me that you may have other photos that you're printing and talking about. Bill's advise about using a tripod and a self timer will help you to get sharper photos if you are getting any blur caused by camera shake.


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