Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > Newbie Help

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Aug 18, 2004, 4:21 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 6
Default

Hi

First of all sorry iff i posted this in a wrong forum its a newb and a tripod question.

i recently purchased the 300D because i was sick and tired of all those wasted small film fotos. Since i take most of my pictures in the snow with my snowy friends while we are freeriding i also purchased a 70-300 lens now when i'm zoomed in above 100 i get unsharp pictures. So therefore i'm looking to buy a tripod wich has to be small, light weight and preferably fast deployable.

I was looking at this one: Hakube Compact 8-section tripod (24$ + transport)

but it says only for light weight cameras. is the 300d with sigma 70-300 lens lightweight? and 8sections 3legs is 24 sections to deploy even iff i use half the sections the frostbite would kill me before i'm done. (or am i wrong, never used a tripod before.)

i have also been looking at the bilora mini biloret 495 (39€)

21-112cm 590g

and the digi pod 492 (29€ no video camera mount)

21-102 cm 410g

and the cullman 1002 compact.(49$)

31-82cm 540g 3sections/leg can hold 3kg.



but the most important question propably is how stable is it on very unsmooth surfaces? and is it sturdy enuf that iff i crash on it it wont brake in bits and pieces, money isnt a real issue as long its doesnt go 100+, i'm known for my lack of compassion tawords my gear iff it isnt working 100% ok so i really want something that wont let me down on the mountain slopes!



Thanks you very much and sorry bout my poor english :-)

bertje is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Aug 18, 2004, 4:29 AM   #2
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 6
Default

ow yes anybody know iff a filter would be a good idea? sometimes i get unnatural sky or colours. sorry for the dumb questions in a few months i'm going to follow a photography course so after that,...., who knows i might even know and answer to someone elses dumb Q's



annyway thanks
bertje is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 18, 2004, 8:38 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Chako's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 301
Default

Unfortunately, there is no easy ride when it comes to tripods.

Usually, the lighter the tripod, the less stable it is. Also, the more sections it has, the less stable it will be.

I wouldn't consider a tripod for mountain conditions.

Consider several things instead, such as a real good monopod such as those made from Manfrotto, or other like companies. Go for something that only has 2 or 3 sections. Any more, and it becomes compromised. Also, you can use a good sturdymonopod as a climbing stick. In like fashion, have you considered making a climbing stick into a monopod by attaching a tripod mount on the handle? Is that skiing your talking about? If so, why not convert a ski pole with a tripod screw mount.

Also, I know someone who had an old unusable 22. He removed the hardware and converted it into a gun stock tripod. Because it is made out of wood, it is heavy but that can work for you if your trying to stabilize a shot. He simply attached a cable release to it and it works fine.

Another way to go is to get an IS lens. Internal stabilization lenses will allow you to hand hold the camera usually 2f stops lower then you normally could.

As for filters...yes, you can use filters on your camera.

There is no such thing as a dumb question.
Chako is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 19, 2004, 8:29 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 170
Default

Check out this site. I've been using their products for years, for hunting, and can confirm that they are as rugged and sturdy as you'll need them to be. Made for hikers, hunters, naturalists, and photographers. You can even add snow feet.

http://www.stoneypoint.com/

Good luck, Lou
derbunk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 19, 2004, 1:32 PM   #5
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 6
Default

Hi thanks you both for your answer.

As i'm freerding and make a stop to take pictures i'm often out of breath so i get moved pictures rather quick so i dont think the IS lens s gonna do it for me.

but a monopod on the other hand my be the thing i need. but i still have some doubts about is. Does it nullify or dramatically lessen camera motion?

and fot the stoneypoint stuff it looks great but it doesnt seem to be designed for photography and you need to buy a kit to mount on a leg of the tripod. it seems a bit to much hassle to get it up for shooting. ok i could propably leave the kit on the leg but i wonder how much backpack space it would absorb.

annyway thanks alot for yor great advice guys.
bertje is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 19, 2004, 3:54 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 170
Default

re: Stoney Point - I have both a mono and a bipod. The mono screws firmly to the bottom of the camera via the tripod socket and eliminates up and down movement. I rest the lens barrel in the V of the bipod when using that, eliminating side to side movement as well. The tiny bit of front to rear movement would probably only matter in macro photography. All of their products are very light and sturdy, and can be carried on a backpack, across the back with a shoulder strap, or on the belt.

Later, Lou
derbunk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 19, 2004, 7:33 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
BillDrew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Hay River Township, WI
Posts: 2,512
Default

Do some experiments without a tripod. Try sitting so you can put your elbows on your knees. Or lying on the ground so your elbows are on the ground - better yet, have your wrists on a stump/rock/whatever.

Talk to folks who are into archery or shooting. They have exactly the same problem with holding steady and have developed some good techniques. Maybe even take a couple of classes after you talk to the instructor so he knows what you are trying to learn.

Might even be worth taking some yoga classes to learn something about breath control.

None of that will be as stable as a tripod, but you are likely do better than you are now. It is zero weight to carry and is always with you. With some practice you might be able to shoot at 200 instead of the 100 limit you noted.
BillDrew is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 1:51 PM.