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Old Nov 6, 2002, 1:08 AM   #1
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Default Taking pics of coins

I need to take close up pics of rare coins Silver, Gold and Copper...right now I am using an old Sony Mactiva on a copy stand...I am not satisfied with the results which are not consistant..can't find the proper lighting to bring out the true colors of the coin....I use natural light by a window.. most of the time..when it is a bright sunny day my pics come out satisfactory..but on days when it is cloudy the colors are all off...
Looking for a new camera , lighting, equipment etc..that will give me consistency in the pictures and nice quality......if this comes out here is a sample of a recent pic..coin in person is closer to white in color.. this pic is too blue....

Any help would be appreciated
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Old Nov 6, 2002, 1:25 AM   #2
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See here , I am pretty sure that with artificial light and correct white balance, you will get the right color.
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Old Nov 6, 2002, 2:38 AM   #3
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The macrofunction on the Coolpix 4500 is execellent. For lightning equipment - I would use whatever light there is and use the manuel messurement of the light.
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Old Nov 6, 2002, 11:03 AM   #4
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I use a Olympus C4040 and halogen lamp to take pictures of old family photos. I turn the internal flash off and use the auto mode. I have had to switch to manual on some occasions to make adjustments. I have tried other household lighting sources and they do not work as well. The halogen lamp seems to provide the best white light without going in to professional lighting systems.
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Old Nov 6, 2002, 10:14 PM   #5
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Since you are into coins, you may already be a regular on the Collector's Universe site. Someone there should be able to guide you. Once I read about some sort of microscope built mainly for kids. It had a camera that connected to a pc. Saw it on the site somewhere. I'm sure there are some better camera setups too.

http://forums.collectors.com/

P.S.
Nice choice on posting the Morgan Dollar. She's a beautiful lady for her age.

I took this one with my C4040, but I need to learn more about closeups and get better shots:
http://halleronenterprises.com/colle...gan_Dollar.jpg
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Old Nov 6, 2002, 11:48 PM   #6
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Default coin pic

Quote:
Originally Posted by Klaus DK
The macrofunction on the Coolpix 4500 is execellent. For lightning equipment - I would use whatever light there is and use the manuel messurement of the light.
Thank you for your help
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Old Nov 6, 2002, 11:49 PM   #7
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Default coin pics

Quote:
Originally Posted by KCan
See here , I am pretty sure that with artificial light and correct white balance, you will get the right color.
Thank you for your help
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Old Nov 7, 2002, 7:41 AM   #8
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Your problem is white balance. If the cam you're using has a custom white balancing feature, use it and everything should turn out fine. If pics are coming out too blue, that means the cam is white balanced for warmer lighting than partial sun provides. My suspicion is that it's automatically choosing the white balance for you, and when there's bright sun it balances for bright sun shooting, when it's partial sun it balances for incandescent white lighting, which is too much of a jump.

If you're finding that the item is too blue, there are a number of remedies short of buying a new camera.

1) Try a different/custom white balancing.

2) Try artificial lighting (you'll most likely have to take this with suggestion 1).

3) Try a warming filter.

4) Use Photoshop to depress the blue channel.

sev
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Old Nov 7, 2002, 7:04 PM   #9
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the problem isn't the camera.
it's the lighting.

the color of the coin is directly proportional to the time of the day that you shot the coin since it reflects the colors of the light of the time and day depending on whether it's partial sunny, overcast, etc.

artists use what is called "north" light for painting because it yields the most consistent colors. try shooting the coin using a north facing window if available or invest in a copy stand with some photo copy lights.
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Old Nov 7, 2002, 7:51 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ws
the problem isn't the camera.
it's the lighting.

the color of the coin is directly proportional to the time of the day that you shot the coin since it reflects the colors of the light of the time and day depending on whether it's partial sunny, overcast, etc.

artists use what is called "north" light for painting because it yields the most consistent colors. try shooting the coin using a north facing window if available or invest in a copy stand with some photo copy lights.
...

I am using a copy stand....don't think I have the right lights though...they give a red tint to the pic...any suggestions what bulbs to use?....Thank you for help....
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