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Old Jan 7, 2005, 12:19 AM   #11
ecm
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I don't recall my g6 having trouble in low light. It's got a focus assist lamp and quite a powerful little flash. I took hand held shots indoors in low light...no problems at all. I took this other one on a tripod the other night.
Well, I didn't think we were discussing nighttime timer shots, but rather pics of kids indoors. Before you talk about tripods, etc. remember that the OP was worried about catching good pics of his kids - try to get a kid to sit still long enough to set up a tripod, or of that matter, long enough to get a good sharp shot with a shutter speed longer than 1/30 second.....

The G6 may beBETTER in low light, compared to, say, the C-5060, but it's still not GOOD. Turn off the flash and try to take a natural light, hand held pic in any light other than daylight. Then try the same pic with (eg.) a Canon dRebel, even with the F/3.5 kit lens. The Canon dSLR isn't even considered especially "good"at low light shots, but it's a wholelot better than any of the fixed-lens prosumers that I'm aware of.

At any rate, the point of my original post was: with an external TTL flash; theOP willbe a very happy guy; no external flash, not so happy. I'll stick by that recommendation. If nothing else, a large bounce flash with the built-in as fill flash looks really good.... no more harsh shadows.

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Old Jan 7, 2005, 1:49 AM   #12
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With kids moving around quickly, the only factor is range I guess, and also maybe whether you put the camera in auto mode, or manual mode. Now, if you have the subject(s) within the range of the camera flash (and the g6 does have a pretty powerful flash)...and you have manual setting on with the shutter speed you need, then you'll be able to capture kids running around without any problem.

If the subject is beyond the inbuilt flash range...then use external flash. This is general for any camera.

This is me jumping in VERY low light around say 4 metres from the camera. The light was dimmed down until the room was quite dark actually. That was the only light that I left on...in the lowest dim setting just that I could still see a bit in the dark. The picture was taken at 1/200 second, F/2, ISO 400, Manual mode. The only reason things are slightly grainy is due to the high ISO...however, let me tell you that when I meant dim light...I meant true DIM light. I doubt that kids would even be able to run around (or even walk around) without tripping over and falling over things under this same condition....kind of dangerous. Anyhow..the main thing is ... I can't see any blurriness in the jumping shot in the dark.

My face was out of the frame because I didn't bother to use a tripod this time...but rested the camera on top of a chair and used the remote control to take the picture. So it's not like as if I didn't want to be in the picture completely hehehe.

I'll post another picture at 1/125, F8, ISO 50 for comparison.
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Old Jan 7, 2005, 2:28 AM   #13
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1/125, F/8, ISO 50, flash ON, manual mode ... these settings are just for comparison purposes only. But trust me..it was indeed LOW light.

And that 'noose' thing hanging on the wall. That's no noose... it's a rope that I used to learn the figure-of-eight knot that's required for indoor rock-climbing hehehe.

This picture is deceptive of the true amount of light in the room. Because the TRUE lighting condition at the time without the flash was actually like walking around in the DARK. This pic was taken hand-held.
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Old Jan 7, 2005, 8:07 AM   #14
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I dont much about the G6, but before I went DSLR I used my G3 in all manner of photography, we shot fireworks, night shots down our main street of Christmas lights, great landscapes and pretty decent portraits. So if the G6 is an improvement I would say you got the right camera:-)
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Old Jan 7, 2005, 8:43 AM   #15
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Thanks to ALL of you for the fantastic posts! I am very excited about knowing where to start. I think it is indeed unlikely that my kids would be running around in THAT dim of lighting, but I was just trying to consider all circumstances. This is a great place because of people like you!!! Mia
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Old Jan 7, 2005, 10:18 AM   #16
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Kenny_Leong wrote:
Quote:
With kids moving around quickly, the only factor is range I guess, and also maybe whether you put the camera in auto mode, or manual mode. Now, if you have the subject(s) within the range of the camera flash (and the g6 does have a pretty powerful flash)...and you have manual setting on with the shutter speed you need, then you'll be able to capture kids running around without any problem.

If the subject is beyond the inbuilt flash range...then use external flash. This is general for any camera.
I posted a tip on using the hyperfocal distance and large depth of fieldin another thread, but couldn't remember where.. :?so I'll repeat myself here...

The lenses on most digital cameras have a huge depth of field because they are actually quite short compared to 35 mm film cameras or dSLRs. The G6 lens is a 7.2 to 28.8 but will givethe samefield of view as a 35 to 140 lens on a 35 mm camera.

So here's the tip...

Set the camera on aperture priority "A" , set the aperture to f5, iso to 100, and using manual focus, set the focus to 10 feet. When the lens iszoomedout to its widest setting, (i.e. 7.2 mm) thedepth of field with acceptable sharpness will be from 3.5 feet to infinity. With an external flash bounced off the ceiling, the whole room will be evenly lit without any hot spots or dark corners. And with the camera onmanual focus, shutter lag is very short because you're not waiting for the autofocus to lock on.

This works especially well if you use a Canon flash with TTL metering through the camera. I'd recommend the Canon 420 EX,it's the least expensive Canonflash with a swivel/bounce head....

The real beauty of this methodis that the combination of settings...i.e. manual focus set to 10 feet, aperture set to f5, iso settings, etc, can be saved as a custom setting to either C1 or C2 on the mode dial so you don't have to do this every time you want to take flash pictures indoors.

This type of setup can easily be used with other cameras/lens/f-stop combinations. The link below will take you to a website with a calcuator for determining any lens/f-stop/distance combination.

NOTE: for the calculation, you have to use the actual focal length of the lens, not the 35 mm equivalent. If you don't know what the actual focal length is for your camera, the site has a look up section for most digital cameras.

http://www.dofmaster.com/dofjs.html

hope this helps...

Santos
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Old Jan 7, 2005, 7:33 PM   #17
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OK...Now I need a camera dictionary! I truly know NOTHING (other than hit the button)! This is great! Thank you AGAIN! Mia
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Old Jan 7, 2005, 7:43 PM   #18
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You're welcome Mia. Anyhow...G6 can take good pics that's for sure. But the only thing you have to look out for in this camera (G6) is red-eyes in your people subjects in night time photos. The G6 in my opinion is next to useless for taking pics of people at night time...because the chances are that the people will have red eyes...more than what one would expect anyhow. But as they say...if you stick an external flash on the G6 (that's if you want to pay around 150 to 200 dollars for something like a Canon 420EX flash), then this will help to significantly reduce chances of red eyes.
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Old Jan 7, 2005, 7:55 PM   #19
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I am actually starting a notebook with camera information. I am excited about learning more. In it I have all the replies from this post! I will mess around with the camera when it arrives on Tuesday and see what I think. I imagine that most of my pictures will be outside or indoors during the day or when the interior lighting is sufficient. I am VERY glad I'll know what to do in the case that I'm ready to move on to the external flash. I had NO idea how complicated photography was! Thank you again! If you think of anything else, feel free to offer more advice!:-)
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Old Jan 7, 2005, 9:02 PM   #20
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i have a G5 and i would agree about the focusing. i don't consider it a problem but then again i hardly make use of it.

the method i use when shooting at night is... to determine the distance between me and my subject. if i think they're about 7feet away. i manual focus for between 5 and 10 feet(if u use the the bracket to scroll, it brackets between 5-10ft).then shoot. i do get nice results.

if shooting further away, for example shooting fireworks at night. simply place it in manual focus again and set it to infinity(make sure to set the picture to large or raw setting- you can always crop later.

this fireworks shot was taken 5 miles away.(the rear fireworks was added in photoshop-i'm still learning).



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