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Old Feb 5, 2005, 4:00 AM   #1
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I have just purchased a S1 and I am very excited about the camera. Its exactly what I was looking for.

The concern I have is that whilst taking photos indoors on the auto mode, the flash comes on and the photos seemed to be overexposed. What am I doing wrong? The light indoors is not dark and I don't think the flash is necessary - does this mean I need to use the manual settings?

Also, I intend on using the movie mode whilst on holiday and purchased a Sandisk 1GB card. I was going to buy an Ultra 11 but the sales guy said I wouldn't need it for the movie feature so I only got a standard Sandisk 1GB for movies and a 512kb Ultra 11 for photos.After reading a few comments onlineit seems I should have got the Ultra for the movies as well? What do you think?

Thanks for the help:-)
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Old Feb 5, 2005, 9:10 AM   #2
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If you don't think flash is necessary, consult the manual and find out how to turn it off. All cameras of that caliber have the ability to let the owner manipulate the flash any way they see fit. This also includes the ability to "downgrade" the flash a bit, which you might need to experiment with a bit in order to find out where the right setting is in order not to overexpose.

PhilR.
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Old Feb 5, 2005, 10:22 AM   #3
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Unfortunately you need high speed memory card for video on the Canon S1 IS. Some people have had success with "normal" Sandisk memory cards but it all depends on models and is not foolproof. You can test if your card is ok by taking long video. Try taking 9 minute [email protected] FINE video with your memory card (that's the max time with 1 GB). If your card is too slow, the video will stop very early. For example, instead of taking 9 minutes, it might stop after 30 seconds, or 1 minute, or whatever.

The flash on the S1 IS is strong--which is actually a good thing IMO. If you want to disable flash, there is a button on the left side of the camera (when viewed from the back LCD). That toggles the flash ON and OFF.

Flash goes off indoors because there isn't enough light for the S1 IS. Without the flash, the pics might come out blurry (mostly due to handshake--even with IS). The ideal thing is to step back a bit and take the pic.

You are also probably better off using the scene modes (eg. PORTRAIT, LANDSCAPE, FAST/SPORTS, etc) than the AUTO mode. If you know what you are taking, the scene modes are better IMO.

HAving said all that, the best mode to shoot is using the P mode. THe P mode is pretty much the same as the AUTO mode but it lets you control things like ISO speed, flash strength, etc. Once you get the hang of the AUTO mode, switch to the P mode and use it just as you would the AUTO mode (while using the FUNC menu to control things like ISO or whatever that you wnat to mess around with).

So the way I look at it... depending on how knowledgeable you are about photography...

you should learn the AUTO mode --> then the SCENE modes --> then the P mode --> then the SHUTTER PRIORITY and APERATURE PRIORITY modes --> and finally the MANUAL mode

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Old Feb 5, 2005, 8:58 PM   #4
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I will definitely be taking the memory card back to the store and exchanging it for an Ultra 11 card.

I guess Iwillkeep learning about the camera the more I play with it. As long as I know its me and not the camera I am happy.

Thanks so much for the assistance
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Old Feb 6, 2005, 12:08 AM   #5
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One thing about the S1 IS is that the pics are a bit soft so you might want to sharpen them with the bundled Arcsoft PhotoStudio package (or some other graphic editing program), or do it in-camera but it is best if it is done on a computer...
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Old Feb 8, 2005, 10:03 AM   #6
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Yes, it is a good thing that your flash is strong!

Another way to approach this is reduce your exposure by 1 or more F stops.

Read your manual on how to do this.

I am sure then Canon Pro 1S can do this!

Good luck!
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