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Old Feb 5, 2005, 9:50 PM   #1
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I got my ever first digital camera some 2 days ago ... meaning to say I am a real NEWBEE in digital photografy. My camera: Olympus C-5060 (hopefully I won't encounter the problems some other guys got with the Mode Dial button).

I am VERY confused regarding "Resolution" and related isues. The more I read about it in the forums, the more difficult it becomes. Hence a practical question:

"What are the best settings (quality & resolution) to get optimal image quality for a picture measuring 3.5 x 5 or 4 x 6 inches on the compact flash card. I don't mind the file size.

Quality Settings on the camera: OIE-SHQ & HQ, 3:2 TIFF-SHQ &HQ, TIFF, RAW, SHQ, HQ, SQ1-high & normal, SQ2-high & normal, HQ, SQ. (What means OIE ???)

Next.... After transfering said picture to my PC using Olympus Camedia software and then opening it in Corel PhotoPaint or Adobe PhotoShop 7, how can I keep that so called optimal image quality? Once there, should I change the dpi to obtain a good printout. My printer: bubblejet Epson C50.


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Old Feb 6, 2005, 9:41 AM   #2
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An answer to part of your question.
edversyp wrote:
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Next.... After transfering said picture to my PC using Olympus Camedia software and then opening it in Corel PhotoPaint or Adobe PhotoShop 7, how can I keep that so called optimal image quality? ...
One key point is to save the original image exactly as it came from the camera with no changes whatsoever. That does not mean the best image is the one that came straight from the camera, e.g., often cropping will improve a picture. However, you might decide later that a different crop is better - perhaps for a print with a different aspect ratio. This is esp true when you are new since the first few times you modify an image it is likely that you can do better as you learn more. Almost all changes are irreverable, so the only way to undo them is to go back to the original.

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Old Feb 6, 2005, 9:59 AM   #3
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Thanks Bill, this is clear to me now. But what about changing the dpi in a paintprogram (maintaning the aspect ratio and the size) before printing. Will that improve the final print?

Thanks for your cooperation. Eddy
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Old Feb 12, 2005, 9:29 PM   #4
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This is a really hard question to answer, so I'll just offer suggestions instead of hard facts.

Most printers product their best output at between 200 and 300dpi. This is very printer dependent, so experiment.

Most pictures benefit from some sharpening and some contrast adjustments. How much (if any at all) is very picture dependent.

Changing the dpi might help improve quality, but it might not. It rarely hurts quality. (You really should use ppi, pixels-per-inch, because "dpi", dots-per-inch, can be a confusing term. What is a dot? The printer's "dot" or a pixel? I find ppi to be a clearer term. What the printer does to put X pixels per inch doesn't really matter, as long as it does it and it looks good.)

Eric
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Old Feb 13, 2005, 4:30 PM   #5
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edversyp wrote:
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... what about changing the dpi in a paintprogram (maintaning the aspect ratio and the size) before printing. Will that improve the final print?
That will either change the size of the print, or it will do nothing - depending on your printing software. It will do nothing whatsoever to change the quality of the print. The dpi simply specifies how close together the "dots" should be placed on the printout/screen. And that might be overridden by the printer software using a size specification and calculating the dpi itself.

dpi has no meaning untill printing/diplaying, and, sometimes, not even then.
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Old Feb 13, 2005, 8:39 PM   #6
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Reducing the picture can make a slightly out of focus picture look more in focus. If you set the ppi to low, the picture will not look good (but it will be big) if you print at a more reasonable ppi it will look smaller but better. To me, that means changing the ppi/dpi can make the picture look "better". I usually agree with Bill Drew, but not this time.

Now, photographicly, it doesn't make the picture look "better". But I assume that is not what you are asking. You are asking how to make the print look better.

You questiona bout the quality settings should be directed to the forum about that camera. I've never heard of OIE, but I'm a canon DSLR shooter, so I wouldn't have. My suggestion is to shoot in the largest picture settings you can do with the size memory card you have. You never know when you'll want to make that print bigger.

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Old Feb 13, 2005, 9:41 PM   #7
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eric s wrote:
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Reducing the picture can make a slightly out of focus picture look more in focus. If you set the ppi to low, the picture will not look good (but it will be big) if you print at a more reasonable ppi it will look smaller but better. To me, that means changing the ppi/dpi can make the picture look "better". I usually agree with Bill Drew, but not this time.
...
I agree, printing any just about any image to large will make it look bad. In that sense, changing the dpi/ppi will change the quality. There reports of quirks with printers that mean printing at some specific dpi/ppi gives the best results. I don't know much about that since I either let Qimage deal with those issues or send the files out to be printed.

Unless I am missing something, I don't think we disagree, but are addressing somewhat different issues. Changing the dpi/ppi in no way changes the quality of the image as captured in a digital file. The change might have some effect on the quality of the print depending on the software and printer used.
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Old Feb 13, 2005, 11:02 PM   #8
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Speaking of QImage, do you like it? It's one of those pieces of software that I've seen a few people use but it doesn't seem to be talked about. Is it worth it? What do you think it does better? Maybe I should be asking these in the QImage section of the forum....

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Old Feb 14, 2005, 1:34 AM   #9
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I like Qimage. Is it worth it? Maybe not for just printing if you know what you are doing, but it is also a good set of batch utilities.
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