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Old Feb 26, 2005, 12:20 AM   #1
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Hi!:-D I was wondering if someone could recommend a really good book for a somewhat beginner to digital photography (photography in general too). I'm wanting to learn LOTS of things - what all the terms mean (f-stops, aperature, etc), tips on taking pics,explanations for camera specifications, etc, etc, etc.

I've been looking at the following two books on amazon.com.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...8&v=glance

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...R&v=glance


Any advice would be appreciated! Oh, and I'm looking into getting a digital SLR camera, I've already got a regular digital, but I'm wanting more power (possibly Canon Digital Rebel).

Thanks in advance!! :-)

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Old Feb 28, 2005, 7:02 AM   #2
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bitsy77 wrote:
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Hi! :-D I was wondering if someone could recommend a really good book for a somewhat beginner to digital photography (photography in general too). I'm wanting to learn LOTS of things - what all the terms mean (f-stops, aperature, etc), tips on taking pics, explanations for camera specifications, etc, etc, etc. ...
The one book specificly for digital photography that should be carefully read is your camera's manual. Otherwise, any well written photo book will cover what the terms mean. Doesn't really matter if it is written in terms of chemical or digital cameras. Your best bet is your library.
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Old Feb 28, 2005, 10:03 AM   #3
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BillDrew wrote:
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The one book specificly for digital photography that should be carefully read is your camera's manual.
Wise words from BillDrew. Many posters would be able to answer a lot of their own questions if they did this more thoroughly.

I tend to concern myself with the editing side of photography, relying on post processing to get me out of a hole. If only I could be bothered to learn more about which you ask, then perhaps I wouldn't be so reliant on it, and I would surely have many more keepers.:roll:

Of the two books you have in mind, the second one looks a good choice as the write up specifies the topics you are wanting to learn. Just don't forget to add another item to qualify for free shipping.

Also as BillDrew said, most well written books should cover the basics of photography, but when it comes to expanding with various techniques there are many many more to choose from,and asthey can bemore of a personal preference to the author, it can be a minefield out there, trying to find the right one for you before you run out of money. So always check reviews, as I'm sure you have done with the two you suggest.

Good luck,

Stevekin.
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Old Feb 28, 2005, 11:32 AM   #4
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Thanks so much Stevekin & BillDrew for the advice. I truly appreciate you taking the time.

Have a great day!:|
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Old Feb 28, 2005, 6:13 PM   #5
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You stated that you are a beginner. I would like to recommend an excellent book for the newcomer. It is called "The Art of Seeing" published by Kodak long before digital cameras were invented. You'll not find any discussion of f-stops and shutter speeds, white balance and memory cards.

This book teaches you the basics of SEEING a photograph in your mind in most any situation. It deals with composition, lighting, color, etc., not with cameras. This book is applicable to any kind of camera, old or new. It goes into detail on the principal that if you, the photographer, can't see the picture, no camera is going to make it for you. The camera is simply a tool. To make a good photograph, you must be able to look at a scene and determine the best way to compose the shot.

Granted, you need to know how to use your equipment but more important you need to know how to see the picture. When you look down the street, do you see pavement, curbs and mailboxes, or do you see a window that has a story to tell or a flower poking out of a crack in the cement. Do you see the tree or do you see the doorway of the house framed by the tree. Do you see a sprinkler watering the lawn or do you see a rainbow in the mist created by the sprinkler. You get the idea.

I purchased "The Art of Seeing" over ten years ago but it is still available. I think it is in its third printing, now. You can probably find it on Ebay or Amazon.

Good Luck
Cal Rasmussen
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Old Feb 28, 2005, 6:43 PM   #6
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~National Geographic Photography Field Guide. It covers alot ofstuff and would be a great help.~

8)
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Old Mar 1, 2005, 5:53 PM   #7
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I took a course in Digital Photography 18 months ago, and the book that we used was "How to do Everything with your Digital Camera". The book is writter by Dave Johnson and is published by Osborne/McGraw-Hill

z.:|
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Old Mar 2, 2005, 12:10 AM   #8
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Thanks for the added advice y'all.
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