Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > Newbie Help

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Mar 28, 2005, 12:59 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 3
Default

I just wanted to find out how to find a digital camera that takes the picture when i press the shutter Button. A film camera will snap immedately. Are there digital cameras that will do this. I have a two year old Pentax and it is useless for sports, kids, pets or anything that does not agree to stand still when you take the pic.
duug is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Mar 28, 2005, 5:24 AM   #2
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 16
Default

I know how you feel. The delay in firing on my Canon G2 was infuriating. I missed so many good shots while the camera decided when / if it was going to fire

Having gone back to a slr (albeit a digital one) I have remembered what it is like to take the photo you want (and not one half a second or so later). My 20D with a Canon lens works very well as does a friends 300D with a Sigma lens. They may not be instantaneous but the delay (if there is one) is imperceptible.

If you don't want / fancy an slr then most of the more in depth camera reviews seems to give some feeling for shutter lag. Have a look at the reviews on this site and also www.dpreview.com
PhotoEcosse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 28, 2005, 12:07 PM   #3
Moderator
 
calr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Beaverton, OR
Posts: 8,466
Default

duug wrote:
Quote:
A film camera will snap immedately.
This is not true of all film cameras. Many if not most SLR cameras with auto-focus and auto-exposure have a "two-step" shutter release. You press the shutter button part way to focus and meter the scene and then press the rest of the way to take the shot. If you press the button all the way, bypassing the intermediate step, the camera still takes time to meter and focus before opening the shutter.

Admitted, film SLRs have faster response than digital, however DSLRs have faster response than non-DSLR which is interesting since many non-DSLR cameras don't have physical shutters.

Go figure!

Cal Rasmussen
calr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 28, 2005, 12:26 PM   #4
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 3
Default

I said immediately but I suppose that if you scientifically analyse it Nothing is immediate; perhaps "imperceptable" would have been a better choice. The whole point is that I have a functional need for a camera and do not consider myself a photographer nor even a serious hobbyist. So my post is really about finding a digital camera that does not have the drawbacks of my current model. So when I started checking things out I was not sure what spec. to look at or even if what I seek is even specified. I did get one tip at a camera shop in Aruba: the salesman said if you can fix the iso speed that that is one of the time consuming calculations and should reduce the lag(anyone agree? or no?) Most point and shoot film cameras seem to capture pets and kids pretty well and I percieve a nearly instant shutter release. Now there may be some microsecond calculations going on but they are not a factor. This is what I would like to see in a digital if it exists. i do realize that it may not be possible. I would like to buy two cameras - one very compact(for convenience) and one with alot of zoom(probably an slr).

Thanks for taking time to respond, I really appreciate it.
duug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 28, 2005, 12:32 PM   #5
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 3
Default

Thanks very much your suggestion led me to this on dpreview:
Total Lag (Full-press Lag)
The amount of time it takes from a full depression of the shutter release button (without performing a half-press of the shutter release) to the image being taken. This is more representative of the use of the camera in a spur of the moment "point and shoot" situation. The Total Lag is not equal to the sum of the Autofocus and Shutter Release Lags.

This really helps since I will now know what spec. to look for.
duug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 28, 2005, 12:47 PM   #6
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

duug wrote:
Quote:
A film camera will snap immedately.
I'm going to have to agree with Cal on this one (a film camera isn't necessarily faster).

It all depends on the camera, lens, lighting and subject.

Heck, I've got a Nikon SLR that still gets used often (mostly by my wife anymore)thatwears an old Sigma "ZoomMaster" lens most of the time. It probably focuses slower than most newer non-DSLRDigital Cameras -- even in good light. :-) Of course, the focus motor is probably a bit on the slow side (it's an N4004s).

Of course, once you focus at a given distance, the next time around, it focuses much fasterbecause it doesn't have as far to move.

Quote:
Are there digital cameras that will do this. I have a two year old Pentax and it is useless for sports, kids, pets or anything that does not agree to stand still when you take the pic.
Check out the review conclusion sections here for cameras you consider. That's where you'll see things like startup time, autofocus lag, cycle times between photos, etc., discussed.


JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 28, 2005, 12:48 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Indian Rocks Beach, FL
Posts: 4,036
Default

Imaging Resource has a page like this in all their reviews: http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/SD300/SD3DATA.HTM It is easier to get the shutter lag information in Dave's table than digging it out of text if you are primarily looking for shutter lag.

Notice the pre-focus lag is nearly instant. You can half press the shutter to pre-focus and snap the picture you want instantly. This is nearly useless for dynamic situations if you have to release the shutter and pre-focus again if your intended target moves. But many cameras have a "continuous focus" mode that will let it continue to focus while you are pre-focused. This makes the pre-focus an option in most circumstances.

I have two cameras with continuous focus and one without. It is a bear to get good shots of perpetual motion rugrats without continuous focus, but very easy with it. It uses more battery, but I won't buy another camera without it having continuous focus. You can switch it off to preserve battery when you don't need it.

You will have to dig yourself in the specs or record menus to find out whether a particular camera has continuous focus. The reviewers seldom mention it and never test the efficacy. I think some might be better than others, but I have no way of knowing.


slipe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 28, 2005, 6:23 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 935
Default

I just consider the shutter lag to be the time it takes for the light controlling mechanism to activate - starting from the time you press the button, but not including focusing and in-camera computations. This lag would probably be dominated by the reaction time of our brain/finger (ie the brain says 'press', but message must get to the finger, and then the finger has to push down 5 millimetres or something).

I don't consider focusing and computations to be part of the shutter lag time, because if you include something like focusing, then it means that you cannot ignore this definition for manual focusing of cameras using the focusing ring/collar....which could be many seconds.

If the lighting is good, I just try to set a big aperture number (ie make the iris small) on my point and shoot, and set the zoom to something adequate, then set a fast enough shutter speed like 1/250. Then I do the usual speed trick, by pressing the shutter button half-way to focus on the background, which sets up the camera for a quick shot time. Then just take a shot at various ISO settings (if your camera allows for that) just to make sure the lighting looks ok. Usually for our point and shoot camera, we can get large depth of view for the narrow iris settings. So this means you can have everything in-focus...even though some folks prefer to have only the subject in-focus.
Kenny_Leong is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 15, 2005, 4:59 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 438
Default

Kenny_Leong wrote:
Quote:
I just consider the shutter lag to be the time it takes for the light controlling mechanism to activate - starting from the time you press the button, but not including focusing and in-camera computations.
Shutter lag is the time it takes for the camera to take the picture after the button is pressed. Period. Whatcalculations or adjustments are made in this period don't matter. And yes, yo do have to add your own reaction time to get proper timing.

I have managed to get some good shots with my camera which has significant lag if the button is pressed all the way in a single shot. By pressing half-way ahead of time long enough for the camera to fix focus and exposition, the lag from pressing the button for the second half of its travel is very small and if you know your reaction time and camera lag from the half way point you can get nice action shots.
luisr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 29, 2005, 9:56 AM   #10
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 25
Default

luisr wrote:
Quote:
Kenny_Leong wrote:
Quote:
I just consider the shutter lag to be the time it takes for the light controlling mechanism to activate - starting from the time you press the button, but not including focusing and in-camera computations.
Shutter lag is the time it takes for the camera to take the picture after the button is pressed. Period. Whatcalculations or adjustments are made in this period don't matter. And yes, yo do have to add your own reaction time to get proper timing.

I have managed to get some good shots with my camera which has significant lag if the button is pressed all the way in a single shot. By pressing half-way ahead of time long enough for the camera to fix focus and exposition, the lag from pressing the button for the second half of its travel is very small and if you know your reaction time and camera lag from the half way point you can get nice action shots.
andreaclassen is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:27 PM.