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Old Mar 28, 2005, 8:59 AM   #1
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Could someone please define 100% crop?
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Old Mar 28, 2005, 11:27 AM   #2
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It sounds like a conflict in terms and I'm not sure it has a definition. I'll take a stab at what someone might refer to by saying "100% crop".

A standard 3:4 digital image isn't in a perfect ratio for any standard print size. So you have to take some of the top and bottom or sides to make a standard print. My guess is that a 100% crop would be to take all the pixels you can for a particular print size so that you take the maximum width or height.

This would be my guess of what would be meant by a 100% crop of a 4:3 image for a 4 X 6 print:



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Old Mar 28, 2005, 12:18 PM   #3
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Crow,

I believe 100% crop refers to cropping out a section of a full-size image. So if you were to go into your photo editor and display the actual picture size you'll see it's pretty large - much larger than a single screen worth. You then crop out a section of that full size image . It is typically done to show the detail of the photo if it were to be printed at it's largest possible size without extrapolation. Does this help?
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Old Mar 28, 2005, 12:58 PM   #4
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JohnG wrote:
Quote:
Crow,

I believe 100% crop refers to cropping out a section of a full-size image. So if you were to go into your photo editor and display the actual picture size you'll see it's pretty large - much larger than a single screen worth. You then crop out a section of that full size image . It is typically done to show the detail of the photo if it were to be printed at it's largest possible size without extrapolation. Does this help?
Why not just zoom until your editor shows 100%? This is a screen shot from Photoshop:



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Old Mar 28, 2005, 12:59 PM   #5
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Yes, thanks. I thought maybe it had something to do with how much of a crop you did to your photo in relation to how big itwas to start with and then how well it would print as opposed to the full size photo.
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Old Mar 28, 2005, 4:06 PM   #6
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John G is right.

Check this thread out:

http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...263067#p263067

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Old Mar 28, 2005, 4:09 PM   #7
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slipe wrote:
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JohnG wrote:
Quote:
Crow,
Why not just zoom until your editor shows 100%? This is a screen shot from Photoshop:


Because you want to show a smallsection of the total photo. 100% = 100% magnification; crop =crop.

For example, when Steve does reviews, he might show a 64x64 pixel square of the same subject (at 100% magnification) to demonstrate moire differences from one camera to another. A full 100% image on, say, an 8 MP camera would be too big to display in a browswer window, and it would be difficult to draw the attention of the reader to the one particular thing (tightly spaced vertical lines on a building for example). Often you'll see an entire picture that's been resized for the screen, along with an "enlarged" section to demonstrate detail. But to show that the author has not truly "enlarged" the image at all, but rather cropped it at the 100% level, he'll write "100% crop."

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