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Old May 15, 2005, 8:02 AM   #1
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I saw one of these pictures http://www.steves-digicams.com/dpotd...1/01192001.jpg

Does anybody maby know how to shoot that type of photo. I looks to me like they used a flash but there is so much light in the background.

Sean Venter:?:
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Old May 15, 2005, 9:53 AM   #2
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I forget the technical term, but a lot of cameraswill let you keep the shutter open for a long time as well as using a flash. So you use the flash to illuminate the person in the foreground, but the shutter stays open for two seconds, or whatever, to expose the background nicely too.
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Old May 15, 2005, 9:59 AM   #3
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There are two possibilities here. First is that an artificial backdrop was used in a studio.

More likely, fill flash was used. This is a very common technique. Most cameras are capable of it. It is simply a matter of turning the flash "on" instead of "auto". What this means is that the flash will fire even if the camera doesn't think it needs it.

The idea is this. The camera thinks there is plenty of light in the scene for a photo without flash so it doesn't call for flash. This is true if you don't care about the foreground which will be dark. However, if you want a foreground subject to be properly lit while including the background, you need to force the flash.

Another possible method, although I don't think it was used here, is the use of a "night portrait" mode. Not all cameras have this. Night portrait mode uses a slow shutter speed. I fires the flash at the beginning of the shot and then holds the shutter open a little bit longer. The flash only lasts for about 1/10000th of a second so a shutter speed of 1/60th would do well. The idea is for the flash to illuminate the foreground subject and the slower shutter to capture the background. I think this technique, when used manually, is called "dragging the shutter".

Hope this helps.

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Old May 15, 2005, 11:14 AM   #4
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Thanks For That Everybody. But I suppose with a canon 300D you proberly need an external flash to do something like that.



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Old May 15, 2005, 11:22 AM   #5
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Check your camera manual. It is very likely that you can switch the flash from auto to on. Although I am not familiar with your camera, it may have a night mode and possibly a night portrait mode. Night mode is NOT what you are looking for here. Look for night PORTRAIT mode. Not too many cameras have this.

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Old May 15, 2005, 2:12 PM   #6
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My camera doesn't have night portrait mode. In the manual it says that I should Photograph people at night with portrait mode rather than night scene mode.

Thanks For Your Advice Anyway. I have learned something new today.

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Old May 15, 2005, 2:55 PM   #7
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Thanks from me too Cal!

Caroline.
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Old May 15, 2005, 5:16 PM   #8
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The techniques mentioned are right on, but in this particularly case I think the photo linked above was Photoshopped.


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Old May 15, 2005, 5:57 PM   #9
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it's called 'dragging the shutter'

the term refers to shooting at a shutter speed SLOWER than the sync speed

it can be "night scene", "second curtain sync", or it can be done manually
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Old May 21, 2005, 9:41 PM   #10
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cheese22 wrote:
Quote:
My camera doesn't have night portrait mode. In the manual it says that I should Photograph people at night with portrait mode rather than night scene mode.

Thanks For Your Advice Anyway. I have learned something new today.
Ask this down in the Canon EOS Digital SLRforum. I don't have a 300D but if it can be done (I'll bet it can) some one there will know how.


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