Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > Newbie Help

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Dec 26, 2002, 2:21 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 5
Default Digital vs Film Question

:roll:
I’m looking to replace my stolen Olympus C-3040z digital camera. Before I buy though, I have two very basic questions:

1. Why did my images in my digital camera not quite live up to the images in my film camera (Canon Sure Shot Z135)? Often (not even most of the time) my digital image’s colors were muted relative to the same image on the cheaper film camera (converted to digital images of similar resolution). The film image was more consistantly “realistic” than the digital.

2. Would a higher resolution (5megapixel) camera capture more realistic colors?

I take tourist pictures and expect realistic capture of the colors.

Thanks for your assistance.
WayneH is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Dec 26, 2002, 6:06 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 77
Default Digital vs film question

Hi WayneH,

I'm not an expert in this field but the main reason your digital images were nothing like your film images is the way they are recorded. Film will always give superior results to digital pictures as it has the capacity to do so in the way it is made up of light sensitive crystals. Digital pics on the other hand are recorded by a CCD or Charge Coupled Device which is made up of rows and rows of regular shaped dots. A five megapixel camera won't get you any closer to regular film quality as the images are still recorded the same way but you will get much more detail and be able to print out larger photos from your printer. Unfortunately digital pics will always have muted colours and have a 'softness' to them.

Rimbo 8)
rimbo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 26, 2002, 6:06 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 544
Default

Did you print your own digital camera pictures or have them processed professionally? If you printed them yourself, what kind of printer did you use?

Take a few files to Wal-Mart and see how they look when professionally printed.
Wildman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 27, 2002, 12:21 PM   #4
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 5
Default



Rimbo and Wildman:

I'm looking at images on my monitor. The digital were taken by me and unaltered, while the film images were taken by me and professionally developed then written to CD.

I can enhance my digital images, but that's time consuming. Does a professional developing machine enhance film automatically?

I appreciate your help.

--WayneH
WayneH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 27, 2002, 7:03 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 544
Default

The folks who do professional prints don't retouch or enhance them... they print them. Some places have kiosks that let you crop and rotate pictures before printing.

One of the big advantages of digital photography is the option to touch up, rotate, crop, or otherwise enhance your photos. The biggest advantage is that you only print those you want to print. In my case, that's about ten percent.

You might consider enhancing your pictures as a time consuming and tedious exercise... some of us enjoy it
Wildman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 29, 2002, 12:25 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 2,162
Default

Comparing film with digicam is like comparing 24fps 16/35mm with electronic for TV. If you like the grain, film gamma, motion judder, and film artefacts then you do want the 'film look' Personally I like sharp, clean noise free pics end enjoy the control in post edit. However, with digital, I hate the lack of dynamic range, avoiding white clipping and lack of DOF control.

BUT I accept that colorimetry for digicams doesn't quite offer the variability of choice (not always good) that film stock does - but you can choose your personal look in digital editing and use the mass update tools. One day we might be able to dial in our film colour preferences (or find them in the editor!). Digicams still have a way to improve, but already amateur users are getting good pics and finding photography more interesting, accessible and cheaper.

My UK on-line service told me that if (from the file header), a pic has been edited, then their Frontier printer prints 'as is'. If the pics are straight off the cam, they crop and exposure compensate. If I was a newbie to a digicam, before getting involved with monitor calibration etc, I'd get a few prints done unedited, by Walmart. If your editing and printing results are worse, then you won't have wasted time fixing pics not broken!

More Mpix isn't about colour gamut , that's a function of the sensor characteristics, on top of which is overlayed each manufacturers 'look' in software. Today, if I had the cash and liked film that much, I'd shoot film and scan with a prof. high end scanner.
voxmagna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 29, 2002, 3:57 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 307
Default

I print 4x6, 5x7 and occasionally 8x10 prints from my Fujifilm FinePix 2800 which I do not consider as inferior to lab prints from local services (such as Wal-Mart). When they are mounted in glass frames they are even better. I do not mean that if you 'inspected' them with a magnifying glass that you might not see differences, but that's not the point. A print should look good from a normal viewing distance, such as arm's length for an 8x10 and half that for the others.
I use generic (cheapest) Glossy print paper on a HP 842C ($69 Cdn.) printer using the RetII photo setting. I usually increase sharpness and mid-tone brightness a bit or the prints are a bit 'duller' than they appear on my monitor.
Most people who see the pictures are not aware that they are digital and usually are 'shocked' when they find out they come from a 2MP camera and were printed at home. We mix 35mm and digital prints in our display areas, and do not feel one is in any way inferior to the other. If you wish to see the pictures go to:
http://www.pbase.com/mentorron/my_finepix_2800_
MentorRon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 29, 2002, 4:25 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 2,162
Default

MentorRon: have you noticed any fading yet on your inkjet prints?

I'm hoping my halide prints fixed with hypo from a Fuji Frontier will last at least as long as those my grandma took with her box Brownie 75+ years ago, which I am now scanning!

I don't mind spending 24p(UK) each on line, for peace of mind on the special shots.
voxmagna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 7, 2003, 2:15 PM   #9
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 5
Default

Guys, the problem is simpler than you're making it. My digital cameral image of the sky and forest background appeared to have a 30% gray filter on the lens (not an exaggeration). While the film picture has a bright blue sky and lush greens in the trees. My memory of the day was much nearer the film version.

I have had other pictures where there was virtually no difference between the film and the digital images.

Can this be a bad (erratic) light sensor in the digital camera?
If I could post both photos you'd see the sharp difference.

Again, thanks for you assistance.
WayneH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 7, 2003, 3:48 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 2,162
Default

Film manufacturers and labs have been applying their own individual brand of colour 'taste' for years, some go for vivid contrast and colour, others for flatter more faithful scene reproduction. Most people want their happy holiday snaps to look bright and cheery!

Have you tried shooting the same scene, film and digicam, then putting both the film and digipics in for 1hr processing?

Little did you know that they would scan your film neg, and use the same printer as for the digicam files. This is what the mass market is seeing as consumer film quality now on their prints. OK we're only talking 6X4's. so 300dpi is fair, but would still not compare to a film contact print!
voxmagna is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 6:08 PM.