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Old Jun 12, 2005, 2:46 PM   #1
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New to my Nikon D70 and want to know the best settings to get a person in the foreground and the mountains etc in the background all in focus?

I am finding I either get good focus on the person or the mountain , but not both.



Thanks!
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Old Jun 12, 2005, 2:47 PM   #2
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New to my Nikon D70 and want to know the best settings to get a person in the foreground and the mountains etc in the background all in focus?

I am finding I either get good focus on the person or the mountain , but not both.



Thanks!
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Old Jun 12, 2005, 6:44 PM   #3
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Depth of Field (the amount of the scene in focus as you get further away from your focus point)is based on Aperture, Focus Distance and Focal Length.

Shoot at a wider focal length, smaller aperture (higher f/stop number) in Av mode, and don't let your subject occupy any more of the frame than you need to for composition purposes. Note that smaller apertures require slower shutter speeds for any given lighting condition and ISO speed (balance shutter speed considerations with aperture).

See this handy online Depth of Field Calculator to see how this works. Make sure to note the Hyperfocal Distance shown foreach aperture/focal length combination, too (as you can see the optimal focus point for getting everything to infinity in focus, while still getting portions of the scene closer to you sharp).

http://www.dofmaster.com/dofjs.html


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Old Jun 12, 2005, 8:43 PM   #4
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Use the highest (smallest opening) aperture setting and widest angle zoom.
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Old Jun 13, 2005, 1:32 PM   #5
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Something else you can do in addition to using the largest aperture setting and widest angle is to focus beyond your subject.

Normally photographers want to increase the background blur and use the depth of focus indications on lenses that have them to help with that. It is based on the fact that subjects within a certain range are sharp enough to be considered in focus. In your case you would want to focus beyond your subject so they are still sharp, and that would help bring the background into sharper focus.

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Old Jun 13, 2005, 3:02 PM   #6
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I thought I responded to this thread yesterday. ;-)

I have merged the two threads together now (the original question was double posted, and Slipe responded to one, while I responded to the other).





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Old Jun 14, 2005, 1:20 AM   #7
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There are basically three things affecting depth of field.
1) Focal length - the shorter the focal length (wider the angle of view, or lower the lens number - 18 mm is lower than 28 mm for example) the more depth of field you have. If you are using a zoom lens, choose the lowest focal length you've got. With the d70 that would be the 18 mm setting if you have the 18 - 70 mm zoom.

2) Aperture - depth of field increases as aperture increases ( smaller aperture size, meaning larger f/number, more depth of field). To get more depth of field use a smaller aperture (large f/number). in combining focal length with aperture then, choosing a really wide angle lens with its smallest aperture will give you maximum depth of field.

3) Point of focus - The focus point that the lens is set at has a huge impact on depth of field. Lets say that you are taking a mountain picture with our buddy in front of it. He is 5 feet away from the camera and the mountain is basically at infinity. Using lowest focal length (lets say 28 mm) and smallest aperture (lets say f/22) you get a lot in focus - but not all. You focus on the mountain, your buddy is just out of focus. You focus on your buddy, the mountain is blurry. Picking a point inbetween is the best. This is called hyperfocal focusing. Using your depth of field preview is a great way to determine where this is. Simply put your focus on manual, press depth of field preview, and focus until both are clear. Check using your play back and enlargement feature.

www.ericspix.com
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