Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > Newbie Help

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jun 30, 2005, 2:22 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 1
Default

This is my first digital camera...I have been comparing cameras for a few weeks and have settled on this one for its 10x zoom, good video, and decent price. Hearing the quote 'swiss army knife' kinda sold me on it as well.

I've been putting having a camera off for a while but now have these kittens I would like to capture :| before they grow up right in front of my eyes. Now I have the incentive.

Therefore my excuse for not having the time to know about all the proper accessories to go with the S1. Frankly all these reviews gives me a headache, I'm sorry.

CF memory cards? How large of one do you think a newb needs to rock n roll? 1GB? Any brands I should look out for? Type I or any reason to go for the thicker Type II?

NiMH batteries and charger? Canon's Battery and Charger Kit CBK4-200? or one with more features http://www.thomas-distributing.com/l...ry_charger.php (48.97).

So many card readers! Which one do you like?

I can't believe a case isn't included with this camera...anyone actually buy the one made for their respective cameras and enjoy it? Or would a bigger one that would fit more than just a camera be more ideal http://www.canoncompanystore.com/epa...ail=8178A001AA

Anything else I'm forgetting about? The help would be appreciated

thx
Water Turkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jun 30, 2005, 4:03 AM   #2
Junior Member
 
sunfury's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 6
Default

I'm a S1 IS owner. You should definitely buy a case. I bought a Lowepro case (it writes Rezo 60 as the model) around $10, and I am really satisfied. It's waterproof and really protects from the impacts. But now I wish I had a bigger case, because I'm also using a lens adapter and some filters, I can only carry 4 spare batteries with my actual case. Here is a photo, showing my case, I put also a battery so you can have an idea about its size.
http://img235.imageshack.us/my.php?image=case2sn.jpg

I also purchased a 512MB Kingston memory card, which is not ultra fast or something but it is OK unless you record a lot of videos in 640*480 superfine setting. I really take a lot of shots but I've never consumed all that 512MB once. It really depends on you.

The batteries you mentioned are 2000ma I think, and the charger seems pretty. I'm using eight 2300ma GP batteries with a Ataba-508 charger. I'm quite happy with them. But I don't think there is a lot of difference between 2300 and 2000 (I've seen 2500ma GP batteries in a store last week, I'm not sure is it worth to upgrade to 2500).
sunfury is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 30, 2005, 10:31 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,870
Default

I'm not familiar with CF cards, but since the S1 IS is only a 3.2 MP camera, a 1 GB card would give you over 1000 picture storage - that's a lot of pictures!!! Unless you plan on taking a lot of long video clips, two 256 MP cards would probably suffice. I have a Fuji S5100, which is a 4 MP camera, and I have two 256 MB cards, which gives me a total of about 500+ pics. I'd rather have two cards than one, in case a card craps out - at least you have a backup.

I am familiar with NiMH batteries and chargers, since I've been using them for awhile - even before I got my digicam. The La Crosse charger you mentioned in your post looks really awesome, but it is quite expensive and I'm not sure how good their own brand of batteries is. The key to success with NiMH batteries is good quality batteries and a good quality charger...a bad charger can ruin the best batteries, and a great charger can't help bad batteries. I'd recommend buying the highest capacity batteries you can find (assuming they're quality batteries). Sanyo, Powerex, and Energizer are all very highly rated batteries. The La Crosse BC-900, the Maha MH-C204W, and the Lightning Pack 4000N are all very good chargers. I've had very good success with a Hubgiant (the manufacturer of the Lightning Pack) with NexCell 2400 mAH batteries. I get about 400 shots per charge with my S5100, which includes a lot of zooming, playbacks, and uploading. Here is a pretty good deal on the Lightning Pack 4000N and Sanyo 2500's:

http://www.ripvan100.com/combos.htm

I don't use a card reader - never had a reason to...I go right from the camera to my computer with a USB cable - works fine. All memory cards have tiny contacts on them, which must match up with the contacts in your camera and/or card reader. IMHO, every time you remove and reinsert a card, you are wearing down the contacts. Eventually, they will no longer make contact.

I don't think any camera manufacturer includes cases with their digicams. I think the OEM camera cases are overpriced, and may not be as good as some of the aftermarket ones. I bought a Tamrac, in which my camera fits sideways, with the sunscreen on, and has two side pouches and a front pouch for accessories. I carry a battery charger, USB cable, additional memory cards, and 8 extra batteries in the case. Here's a link to a post I made a while back:

http://stevesforums.com/forums/view_...281312#p281312

You're forgetting a UV filter...the Hoyas are very good:

http://www.2filter.com/prices/specials.html

Enjoy your new camera and the kittens.

the Hun



rinniethehun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 30, 2005, 11:01 AM   #4
Junior Member
 
sunfury's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 6
Default

rinniethehun wrote:
Quote:
I don't use a card reader - never had a reason to...I go right from the camera to my computer with a USB cable - works fine. All memory cards have tiny contacts on them, which must match up with the contacts in your camera and/or card reader. IMHO, every time you remove and reinsert a card, you are wearing down the contacts. Eventually, they will no longer make contact.
I think the Hun has a good point. Plus, I really don't like the feeling of the S1's CF slot cap when I'm opening and closing it. It seems a little bit fragile. So I prefer the USB cable.
sunfury is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 30, 2005, 11:25 AM   #5
Moderator
 
calr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Beaverton, OR
Posts: 8,466
Default

Most people advise the use of a card reader. I have used both methods of transferring pictures to the computer and I much prefer the card reader. It is much faster and I don't have to worry about finding that d--n cable!

As for damaging or wearing out the pins, not likely to happen. Those things are designed for thousands of insertions. You'll wear out the camera before you come close to the design limits of the card.

Another argument against using the cable from the camera is that you are using camera battery power to transfer the files. On a DSLR with high-power Lion batteries this is not a big problem but on camera using NiMH batteries, it can be significant.

In some cases, you need to install software to use the cable. If you use Windows XP on your computer, it recognizes the card reader as a removeable drive with no extra software or drivers required.

I rest my case.

Cal Rasmussen

calr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 30, 2005, 12:04 PM   #6
Junior Member
 
sunfury's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 6
Default

Cal, you killed most of the arguments against the CF card reader, I agreed you when I read your post but, the Powershot S1 IS' CF slot cover really frightens me (at least mine). Open and close it for a few times, you'll see that letting it closed and using a cable would be a wise decision.

However, as you said, transfer speed would be significantly greater when using a card reader, S1 just uses USB 1.1 interface for cable and it's frustrating when you transfer huge videos.
sunfury is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 30, 2005, 12:46 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 36
Default

The lens adapter and a screw-in UV filter are important to protect your delicate and valuable lens. Ultimately, if you really want to get the most out of the camera and zoom and manual control, you're going to have to get a tripod.Though ifyou're using it for basically everyday shapshots, then that's not as urgent.


S1Artiste is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 30, 2005, 1:46 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,870
Default

cal,

You're absolutely right about the speed difference between uploading pics with a USB 1.1 camera and a USB 2.0 card reader. The USB 2.0 is up to 40 times faster than the 1.1, depending on the card type. I just timed an upload of pics and video from a maxed out 256 MB xD card, and it took 5 minutes and 42 seconds. I guess using a 2.0 reader with a 256 MB CF card would take about a minute. I can see where uploading a couple of 2 GB cards would get a little annoying with 1.1 USB, but I don't mind waiting for 5 minutes. Usually, I upload pics way before I've maxed out the card.

I'm not so sure about the thousands of insertions statement that you made, however. Most high quality electrical contacts are flash plated with gold to prevent corrosion of the copper in the contacts. Having spent some time in the plating industry, I know that a "flash" plate thickness is usually from 0.0001 to 0.0003". Like any industry today, the metal finishing industry is out to decrease costs and increase profits. Since gold is extremely expensive, if you give someone an option to plate gold to a thickness of 0.0001 or 0.0003", which thickness do you think they'll shoot for? And who's to say that they will make at least the minimum every time? Gold is a fairly soft metal and can be abraded fairly easily. Once it has been removed from the contacts, the contacts will begin corroding, and eventually restrict the flow of electricity. I could be dead wrong about this...maybe these chips are made to higher standards...maybe the plating thickness is a half mil or more, but somehow I kinda doubt it.

Another statement that you made which I must disagree with is the perceived problem with battery drain by using the camera to upload pics. My S5100 will playback for over 11 hours with 2400 mAH NiMH batteries - the 5 minutes it takes to upload a full card will have very little effect on battery life.

Finally, Windows XP recognizes my camera as a removable drive, and gives me options of what to do with the pictures. I installed the camera software, but I'm not obligated to use it - it is only one of the options I get when I plug my camera into my computer.

the Hun



rinniethehun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 30, 2005, 1:46 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,870
Default

double post - whoops!
rinniethehun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 30, 2005, 5:45 PM   #10
Member
 
logrhythmic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 48
Default

You said,

I don't use a card reader - never had a reason to...I go right from the camera to my computer with a USB cable - works fine. All memory cards have tiny contacts on them, which must match up with the contacts in your camera and/or card reader. IMHO, every time you remove and reinsert a card, you are wearing down the contacts. Eventually, they will no longer make contact.


That's true, but how long is eventually? I'm surprised no one mentioned the wear and tear on the USB plug and socket. I am less worried about the CF card being pulled in and out, than wearing out my USB port which seems to be a lot more fragile. How about compromising like me and use the USB connector for smaller downloads and the CF card reader for larger (and faster) downloads?
logrhythmic is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:34 PM.