Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > Newbie Help

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jan 10, 2003, 3:41 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 4
Default Microdrives with the G3

As I have mentioned before, I'm going on a 5 week overseas trip. I'm now looking at getting a Canon G3. Memory has always been a concern for me, but I have just discovered the IBM microdrives.

Is this a viable solution to my concerns with not having enough space? I've read that they chew up the batteries and some people don't recommend relying solely upon the microdrives. If I was to purchase one of these I would have a 32MB flash card and the microdrive. Do you think it would be okay to rely solely on these? Also how bad are they at chewing batteries?

Also as I am totally new to the microdrive, how do you go about transferring them to a computer? Is it just the same as with a flash card?

Thanks for your help guys
Phillippa is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jan 10, 2003, 6:37 AM   #2
NHL
Senior Member
 
NHL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: 39.18776, -77.311353333333
Posts: 11,547
Default

It's the same as with flash card... (or is it the other way around since the CF standard is based on hardisk legacy specification).

The device does have power saving feature, but the G3 battery is quite adequate. That's why it's always a good idea to pick a camera with NiMh AA when one plans to use a microdrive... As with any camera you should plan on bringing spare batteries.
NHL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 10, 2003, 7:17 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 5,803
Default

There is also the limitations of a MicroDrive you have to worry about. I'm specifically thinking about the 10,000 foot limit. If you are taking a vacation to go climb a (tall) mountain you might have trouble using the MicroDrive.

They are also more sensitive to being bounced around (while in use. I assume they park their heads when not in use.) Maybe someone can talk more about this issue as I haven't use a MD, but I've read about them.

Eric
eric s is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 10, 2003, 7:39 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
BillDrew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Hay River Township, WI
Posts: 2,512
Default

Altitude is the only real limit with the microdrives that does not also exist for solid state. Don't use one above 10,000ft/3000m.

The major source of problems for all kinds of memory is handling. Microdrives are more fragile, but since they hold more they are handled less. If you are carefull, you shouldn't have any problems. If you are not carefull, you are likely to have problems no matter what kind of memory you use.
BillDrew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 10, 2003, 9:43 AM   #5
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 10
Default

I have a 1 gigabyte microdrive that I use in my Canon G2 and iīm very pleased with it. I also have 32 and 128 megabyte CF-cards and the difference in powerconsumtion isnīt very big. If you decide to buy the microdrive do buy an extra battery because with my G2 I canīt fill the card on one charge and I suppose that the G3 use more power than the G2. I know that the Canon batteries are expensive but I donīt regret buying that extra one.

I donīt think you should rely on just one card in any case. Things do break and having a backup-solution is always nice. I use my CF-cards mostly when the wether is really bad. When itīs -20° C and heavy winds I just donīt have the nerve to use the Microdrive

www.pbase.com/fjalstal
fjalstal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 10, 2003, 9:48 AM   #6
NHL
Senior Member
 
NHL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: 39.18776, -77.311353333333
Posts: 11,547
Default

FYI everyone... The device is designed for portable application, as a reference a rollercoater ride'll give anyone less of a headache:

Operating:
Temperature: 0-65C
Humidity: 8-90%
Shock: 175G
Vibration: 0.67G (random)
Vibration: 1G (swept sine wave)

Of course it's much higher while non-operating:
http://www.hgst.com/hdd/micro/datasheet.htm

(2) The term "Non-Operating" refers to the storage temperature of a microdrive. For example, sitting in the trunk of the car on a cold Minnesota morning or warmed by the rays of the Caribbean sun. The drive will begin to run once the temperature has risen to the operating specification value.
NHL is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 8:42 PM.