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Old Jan 31, 2003, 9:13 PM   #11
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It would be possible to consider the calculations that are used for the Bayer pattern to RGB as well as the variations jawz mention. Also the order of in-camera sharpening, white balance, contrast, ... could effect at least the edges. And it is likely that different cameras do it differently, so the only reasonable answer is to do the tests on your own camera and see what works best.

Obviously, if one method is better than the other (I'd bet on post shot processing, but not much of a bet) - use it. If they are pretty much the same, don't use the digital zoom on the camera to leave yourself better options for framing.
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Old Feb 1, 2003, 12:03 AM   #12
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Bill, would you please elaborate on the last sentence of your post? I don't quite understand what you mean. Thanks. This thread is interesting. I've always heard digital zoom disparaged. I'm going to try some tests myself. I remember someone mentioning that in good sunlight, his digital zoom did well.
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Old Feb 1, 2003, 7:06 AM   #13
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You must have cut off your Aunt Matilda's head in a photo at least once while you were learning to use a camera (I still do things like that on occasion). That is an example of bad framing. If you crop after the fact, you can avoid that kind of thing.

When you are doing tests, you should have the camera set to all manual if you can. Again, it will likely depend on the camera (more testing :-), but the area used for metering might change using the digital zoom.

You should do your own testing whenever possible instead of just listening to what folks have to say in the forums. To many things are different for different cameras so what is correct for one camera might not be right for another. This is another change from chemical photography - you cannot always assume that what works for model XXX from manufacturer YYY is true for others.
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Old Feb 1, 2003, 10:42 AM   #14
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Thanks, Bill. Your point about framing is quite relevant. I'm off to test my own digital zoom out today.
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