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Old Oct 20, 2005, 2:49 PM   #1
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Can somebody please explain the concept of noise? I've heard it mentioned in the context of dark lighting... please help!
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Old Oct 20, 2005, 3:13 PM   #2
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yeah, noise is what you see mostly when you take a photo is darker conditions. It is akin to grain in film cameras. Looks kind of like static. here is an example on the website of a program designed to lessen the look of noise in photos

http://www.neatimage.com/examples.html

It comes about because in Digital cameras, when it is dark, not enough light is hitting the sensor to properly "activate" it. So the camera tries to boost the signal called rasing the ISO. This increases the sensitivity of the sensor, at the cost of junk in the image.

In film cameras, film had an ISO rating. Higher rating film needed less light to expose, but the image was grainier. This was due to the particular chemical that provided this extra sensitivity. You needed more of it in the faster film.

All in all its a tradeoff. Sometimes in low light you need to get a picture so you sacrifice a little noise over blur (from a slow shutter needed to let more light in)
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Old Oct 23, 2005, 9:11 AM   #3
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One (two) images say more than 1000 words. See at the sky and dark areas

NOISE:
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Old Oct 23, 2005, 9:12 AM   #4
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NO NOISE:


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Old Oct 24, 2005, 10:20 PM   #5
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I have been looking at ahigher ISO camera the fujiS5200but my concern is noise. I know there are programs that fix this but if you look at the corrected pics quite a bit of detail and sharpness are lost unless the noise isreally highthen of course its an improvement.

If you look at msantos pics (above) the vehicle looses sharpness, the trees look flat and lifeless and it has an overallsoft appearance.

So is there any other solution than software manipulation? I hate noise/grain which is the reason I never use a high ISO in my SLR, Id rather work around it, but my digital camera I want to be able to use it right then and not mess around, use it on auto and not worry about how much noise there will be if I dont set the ISO manually and use a tripod or a slave flash.
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Old Oct 25, 2005, 7:33 AM   #6
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mnosbor wrote:
Quote:
So is there any other solution than software manipulation? I hate noise/grain which is the reason I never use a high ISO in my SLR, Id rather work around it, but my digital camera I want to be able to use it right then and not mess around, use it on auto and not worry about how much noise there will be if I dont set the ISO manually and use a tripod or a slave flash.
Maybe I misread, but it sounds like you

a. don't want to use high ISO

b. don't want to use tripod and / or flash

c. don't want to use noise reduction software

but you want noiseless pictures. I think you're out of options (assuming of course it's a situation like above where a wide open aperture on a fast lensi.e. 1.8 is not appropriate ). The noise reduction software on the market is great. But in some instances you have to play around with the settings or do selective reduction.
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Old Oct 25, 2005, 9:00 AM   #7
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Even with film, at high ISOs you have grain(similar to noise in digital). Of course, you can use professional film and tripod, lower ISO, etc, however most of "street" people often does not notice the noise/grain, even when you think it is terrible.

So, I suggest don't care about it and use the tools you have to reduce it as much as possible. IMHO
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Old Oct 26, 2005, 9:27 AM   #8
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If minimum image noise (without using noise removal software)in low light situations is very, very important to you, and you're looking around for a new camera, then my advice generally is to go for a digital SLR. They use larger CCD arrays than compact digicams, so are able to make more use of the light that's available for any given ISO setting. It's not an easychoice if you are an enthusiast. Compacts are easy to take anywhere but have less creative options and poor low-light performance. On the other hand, dSLR's give you the freedom to decide on the aperture or shutter speed, much better low-light performance at a particular ISO setting, but they do weigh more than a compact, bulkier and less attractive as a 'take anywhere' camera. I can't recommend any particular model (mine's a compact!) but I do know my stuff (been a keen photographer for 30+ years). Just got fed up lugging my film SLR around so switched to a Sony digicam with a few manual options.
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