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Old Nov 4, 2005, 6:28 PM   #11
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Interesting, but today I can buy 10X binocs and they could both have a different field of view (if I understand correctly). Isn't that xx feet at 1000 yards the field of view? So do the same magnification binocs have different fields of view. Or maybe I am assuming too much on the magnification factor related to binoculers?
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Old Nov 4, 2005, 8:09 PM   #12
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fofa wrote:
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Interesting, but today I can buy 10X binocs and they could both have a different field of view (if I understand correctly). Isn't that xx feet at 1000 yards the field of view? So do the same magnification binocs have different fields of view. Or maybe I am assuming too much on the magnification factor related to binoculers?
I don't really know about binoculars at all. However, in cameras, the (n)X zoom refers to the range from wide angle to telephoto - for example, a 10X zoom could be 28-280mm, or 35-350mm. Each of those examples would offer a different magnification factor, in terms of how magnified things are at full telephoto, but both are 10X zooms, because of the range they can zoom through.

'Normal' for a 35mm camera is around 50mm, meaning it gives a perspective similar to normal vision. So I imagine 10X binoculars would have a magnification equivalent to what you would get with an ~500mm lens on a 35mm camera - 10X magnification compared to normal vision. I hope that makes sense, and I make no guarantee what I say is true:-).
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Old Nov 5, 2005, 7:45 AM   #13
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When you look through binoculars, you see the image in a circle. With the same magnification, there can be different size image circles. The bigger circle has a wider field of view. Akin to using an add-on telephoto adapter at the wide end of your cameras zoom range - a better quality one will allow a wider zoom before vignetting/distortion sets in.
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Old Nov 5, 2005, 10:43 AM   #14
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So really the wider the field of view, the less the magnification (comparing to the human eye)? If the human eye can see a 100 foot view at 100 yards (I like easy numbers), then 150 yard FOV at 100 yards would be wide angle, and 50 feet would be telephoto. But then again the problem seems to be the starting point. Maybe any would work if the mfg's used a common starting point? That's what I would like to see, a common starting point and work up or down from there, so (just as an example) a +3FOV in this camera has the same perspective as a +3FOV in this camera (instead of 4X vs 3X) but the first one might have a -2FOV wideangle vs -1FOV wideangle.
But I ramble...
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Old Nov 5, 2005, 11:17 AM   #15
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This has gotten a lot more difficult than it needs to be. I think trying to factor in what the human eye can see is needlessly complicating things. In my years of taking pictures, I can't ever remember taking a shot based on what is normal for the human eye to see. In fact alot of photography is trying to capture "normal things" in a different way (macro for example). I use whatever focal length (or field of vision, zoom, magnification etc) to create the composition I am looking for. The current system is fairly easy to understand and has worked well for quite some time. That doesn't mean there may not be a better way to do it, but for now I think things work pretty well.
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Old Nov 5, 2005, 1:33 PM   #16
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Guys, toss all reference to binoculars, they do not record an image they allow you to view it. A 100mm camera lens, regardless of what camera format it is designed for, will "magnify" an image the same amount but the resulting photograph is dependent on the size of the recording medium, the smaller the image sensor (or film) the larger the image will appear, IF PRINTED TO THE SAME SIZE, therefore the final output from a small sensor must be magnified (enlarged) to fit the printing paper. Since binoculars do not print images they can be designed to magnify at say 10X and still maintain a wide angle of view (peripheral vision), because our eyes can actually see a much larger angle than our brain can decipher, the "wide angle" binoculars actually give more peripheral view without reducing the actual magnification.

So give up with the binocular analogy, it does not apply.

Ira
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