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Old Nov 10, 2005, 1:01 PM   #1
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Basic question for you...

When I take pictures of ebay items, my doll collection, or clothes to sell, I have to set up each item separately before shooting, of course... sometimes it takes just a minute or two, sometimes, it might take 5 or more minutes to set up the scene. I wonder if it is hard on a camera to turn it off between shots to save battery power, or if the opposite is true - it might be bad for the camera, and/or may use even more battery power to be switching it on/off all the time....

Should I keep the camera turned on until the end of the session (maybe 30-60 minutes), or maybe take a break every 15-20 minutes and turn it off, or turn it off between each scene?

Thank you for your input!

Jana
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Old Nov 10, 2005, 4:39 PM   #2
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If you are shooting in a controlled environment, why not use an external power (AC)supply if your camera supports it.
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Old Nov 10, 2005, 6:08 PM   #3
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Thanks for the input, bobbyz, I have actually thought about an AC adapter...

I was wondering more about the camera itself... Do you think it's good or bad to be turning it off and on all the time during a shoot? If I shouldn't turn it off between set ups, then how long should I go before giving it a "rest"?

Or maybe it doesn't matter at all.... I'm wondering what most people do...

Jana
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Old Nov 10, 2005, 6:29 PM   #4
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I don't think it really matters. You'll probably want to upgrade the camera before you could possibly wear the switch out. In terms of battery consumption, get a 15 minute or 30 minute charger and have a few sets of batteries. This way you could keep the camera powered on (minimizing the need to power on and off) and always have enough batteries to finish a shoot.
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Old Nov 10, 2005, 9:30 PM   #5
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Most cameras have a power saving mode they switch to after a number of minutes with no inputs. The time is often selectable via the menu. This mode uses very little power from the battery, and will probably not affect the number of pictures you can get from a set of batteries. Switching camera off and on does stress the power supply components somewhat, so I would say that, on balance, it would be easier on the camera to leave it on. I don't have any definitive proof of this, and haven't run any tests, it is just an opinion based on experience.

brian
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Old Nov 11, 2005, 12:19 AM   #6
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Oh, thank you, rjseeney and VTphotog, for your response! Your comments really help me out!
OMG, I never thought about the "sleep" mode! I believe my camera has one! Duh, I never even checked... :roll:

Jana
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Old Nov 11, 2005, 1:53 AM   #7
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I agree, you shouldn't worry about leaving the camera on. The only real concern would be the battery drain, and if you have plenty of batteries that is not a concern. One of the best ways to conserve battery power is to turn your LCD screen off and use the optical viewfinder if your camera allows it.

Electronic engineers I've chatted with seem to agree that mechanicalcomponents (switches, buttons, dials, zooms) usually fail more than electronic components (diodes, resistors, IC chips) and circuits. Heat is usually electronic's enemy, dust is usually mechanical's enemy, and moisture is an enemy of both. Power generates heat, so be aware of the temperature of your equipment. If you find it getting warm, which it really shouldn't, you might give it a rest. When shooting, I turn the camera on and leave it on until I am finished. I have my sleep mode set at 1 minute. I have had to give my flash a rest just to be on the safe side because it was heating up. Best regards-
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Old Nov 18, 2005, 12:07 PM   #8
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I donĀ“t think I have turned either of my cameras off in the last two years...they stay "asleep" at all times so I can just grab it , press the shutter and away we go.

I have never had a problem with battery drainage. I actually think you are right, you would use more power turning it on and off all the time!

Cheers,

Nick

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Old Nov 18, 2005, 5:49 PM   #9
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It probably depends on the camera.

I've got a little Konica KD-510z that I turn off between shots. It's an extending lens design with a sliding cover that also acts as an on/off switch. But, it's startup is fast enough that this is practical (and I prefer to leave the cover closed to protect the lens). Battery life was always a secondary concern.

On most other cameras I've owned, I'd leave them turned on (letting them go to "sleep" after the preprogrammed timeout period).

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