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Old Dec 4, 2005, 9:41 PM   #1
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I am a new owner of an H1 and have read the White Paper, but I need specific settings for the inside of a delivery room.

I have tried to go with the "no brainer" settings, but my experimental pix are seemingly bleached out by the sterile environment of the white walled delivery room.

Any suggestions, or suggested settings is appreciated for this once in a lifetime event.

I will check back regularly until Tues afternoon for your wisdom.
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Old Dec 4, 2005, 10:37 PM   #2
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I don't know what an H1 is, but if it's a still camera you might want to check your metering modes and see whether you have center-weighted or spot metering settings. The center-weighted setting meters light from the whole frame but gives the central area in the viewfinder a higher priority in determining the overall exposure. Spot metering uses only the central area in the viewfinder to determine exposure. Using these modes will help you get a more correct exposure of the subject in the middle of the viewfinder as the white walls will contribute less to the overall exposure.
If your camera has a custom white balance setting, you might want to do that, also. Hospital lighting is usually a mixture of different sources, so the preset white balance settings on your camera might not give good results. Unfortunately, you have to go to the hospital to do the custom setting, but you should do some test pix with the above metering modes anyway.
You could also try exposure bracketing if your camera has this feature. In this mode, the camera usually takes at least three pictures when you push the shutter release -- one at the camera's recommended exposure, one underexposed and one overexposed from the recommended exposure. Usually, the menu gives you a few choices regarding the amount of over and under exposure.
Boy, will my face be red if the H1 is a video cam....
Even if it is, you should still be able to doctor the white balance and adjust the exposure either up or down from the camera's recommended exposure.
Hope you can use some of this! Good luck!
Grant
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Old Dec 26, 2005, 11:36 AM   #3
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If I had to come up with a quick fix for that problem. I would adjust my EV down 1.5 oras many stops as I could. Then fix the results later in Photo Shop.
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Old Dec 26, 2005, 1:13 PM   #4
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Quote:
If I had to come up with a quick fix for that problem. I would adjust my EV down 1.5 oras many stops as I could. Then fix the results later in Photo Shop.
Yep. I agree.

And an H1 is Sony's new big-zoom camera:

http://www.steves-digicams.com/2005_...s/sony_h1.html

(Or it could actually be zomething else... There are more than one E500, more than one Z1, more than one 5D, so I'm never quite sure anymore...:? )


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Old Dec 27, 2005, 9:06 AM   #5
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If the camera has exposure compensation, use that to adjust.
The camera's metering system is picking an exposure... but its getting confused by the amount of white. You need to experiment with someone wearing a white shirt in the sun (or in good light) and practice adjusting the settings until you get it right.

Eric
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Old Dec 27, 2005, 9:26 AM   #6
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The problem is this is a high key situation, the cameras meter is not educated for that. The quick fix I mentioned above is the best way to go. Believe me 1.5 to 2 stops of EV reduction is not going to be to much. And may not even need any post tweaking.

A rather radical way I have tackeled similar situations, is to use the flash. This allows the cameras throttle back towork, and senses allthe light as flash. Another way is to reduce the cameras contrast by - 2 or 3 if your model allows that.

Hospitals are one of the worst situations to take pictures in, unless it would be some place with all black walls. :-)
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Old Dec 27, 2005, 10:18 AM   #7
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The nice thing about spot metering is that you can pre-meter on different parts of the scene. You not only manually bracket your exposure but also get different white balance interpretations.

That isn't much help though if you need everything in the delivery room to be properly exposed. The camera has EV bracketing. I would set it at minus 1.0 EV with a 0.7 EV bracket.

You probably need some post processing in any case. Bright lighting without a lens hood often gives some fogging. Unsharp mask with around 150 radius and 15 amount helps with that. Try both auto-levels and auto-contrast. You can always go back a step if you don't like the results. If you don't like the auto modes try boosting your contrast a little in levels or curves. Avoid the "Contrast" control.

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