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Old Jan 5, 2006, 2:33 AM   #11
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Steve40 wrote:
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So since EXIF is the file type, there is no way to prevent your camera from saving in this format, unless your camera is capable of down loading images in RAW. Which in itself is another can of worms.
EXIF is a standard for storing information within an image file (I would not consider it to be a file type). IOW, don't let it's name fool you (Exchangeable Image File Format).

With JPEG or TIFF images, the EXIF is optional (it doesn't even need to be in the image files, although most camera manufacturers do include it in the camera produced JPEG images).

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Old Jan 5, 2006, 7:28 AM   #12
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JimC wrote:
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Steve40 wrote:
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So since EXIF is the file type, there is no way to prevent your camera from saving in this format, unless your camera is capable of down loading images in RAW. Which in itself is another can of worms.
EXIF is a standard for storing information within an image file (I would not consider it to be a file type). IOW, don't let it's name fool you (Exchangeable Image File Format).

With JPEG or TIFF images, the EXIF is optional (it doesn't even need to be in the image files, although most camera manufacturers do include it in the camera produced JPEG images).


Pardon me!, it's back to school time.

EXIF / Exchangeable Image File – The file format used by most digital cameras. For example, when a typical camera is set to record a JPEG, it's actually recording an EXIF file that uses JPEG compression to compress the photo data within the file.


JPEG – A standard for compressing image data developed by the Joint Photographic Experts Group, hence the name JPEG. Strictly speaking, JPEG is not a file format, it's a compression method that is used within a file format, such as the EXIF-JPEG format common to digital cameras.


And that's the way it is. :-)



EXIF data, which is informtion about the file type is not necessary. But EXIF is a file type. JPEG is a compression algorithm, not a file.

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Old Jan 5, 2006, 8:48 AM   #13
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My Bad... :x

You're correct.

I'd never paid that much attention to the EXIF standard. I guess I should have.

Strictly speaking, JPEG and TIFF are not file types.

But, in common use, I think most photographers would consider the file types as being TIFF or JPEG (understanding that JPEG is a compression standard), and the information related to camera settings as being the EXIF data (and would not use the term EXIF to refer to a file type, even if it's technically accurate). ;-)


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Old Jan 5, 2006, 9:14 AM   #14
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I'll agree on that, most Photographers are not computer people. They are computer users, and understanding the difference between JPEG, and EXIF is not necessary to take or process a photo. But I am a tech, as well as a somewhat photographer. You know how technical people are, we love to run our mouth. :-)
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Old Jan 5, 2006, 10:06 AM   #15
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JimC wrote:
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My Bad... :x

You're correct.

I'd never paid that much attention to the EXIF standard. I guess I should have.

Strictly speaking, JPEG and TIFF are not file types.

Actually, JPEG is not a file format, it is a stream specification. But TIFF is a file format specification (the name, Tag Image File Format, is a clue.)

Since you are generally such a wellspring of technical knowledge, I just couldn't resist twisting your tail here. Sorry.


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Old Jan 5, 2006, 10:07 AM   #16
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BillDrew wrote:
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A BarbieCam might not put the EXIF data into the header of the JPEG file, but I think pretty much all digicams better than that do.
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3.) Can exif data be changed or added to after the picture is on your hdd?
There is software available to do that, but why would you want to?
As a joke on loyal Nikon/Canon/Pentax/Fuji/Olympus/[insert your favorite brand here] fans.

That way, you could insert EXIF data in the BarbieCam generated images (interpolated to a large size, of course), with information that looks like the images were generated by a newly announced DSLR model (and wait for the arguments that the image quality is great, only needing a bit of Post Processing). :-)


Ok -- I'll slap my own wrist for even joking about doing that. ;-)

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Old Jan 5, 2006, 10:38 AM   #17
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tclune wrote:
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JimC wrote:
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My Bad... :x

You're correct.

I'd never paid that much attention to the EXIF standard. I guess I should have.

Strictly speaking, JPEG and TIFF are not file types.

Actually, JPEG is not a file format, it is a stream specification. But TIFF is a file format specification (the name, Tag Image File Format, is a clue.)

Since you are generally such a wellspring of technical knowledge, I just couldn't resist twisting your tail here. Sorry.

I started to say something like that, but decided not to keep pushing the point. :-)
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Old Jan 5, 2006, 11:20 AM   #18
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Steve40 wrote:
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I started to say something like that, but decided not to keep pushing the point. :-)
I guess this proves that I'm the more technical guy, 'cause I have no social skills at all!


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Old Jan 9, 2006, 5:11 AM   #19
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Thank you so much, guys! Very enlightening.
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Old Jan 14, 2006, 1:29 PM   #20
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JimC wrote:
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As a joke on loyal Nikon/Canon/Pentax/Fuji/Olympus/[insert your favorite brand here] fans.

That way, you could insert EXIF data in the BarbieCam generated images (interpolated to a large size, of course), with information that looks like the images were generated by a newly announced DSLR model (and wait for the arguments that the image quality is great, only needing a bit of Post Processing). :-)


Ok -- I'll slap my own wrist for even joking about doing that. ;-)
Exifer allows you to do just exactly this, though I won't go into the method :-). As a result, I generally take included EXIF with a grain of salt, and try to use common sense when analyzing posted pictures.

I recall a thread on another forum where two pictures were posted, ostensibly taken only seconds apart by different cameras, used to "prove" the lens on camera A was inferior to camera B.(there was a lens flare issue) The EXIF data supported this premise, but the images themselves showed completely different shadow directions.

brian
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