Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > Newbie Help

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Dec 30, 2005, 6:27 AM   #11
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 5,803
Default

On canon cameras the EF-S lenses are "made" for the smaller sensors and they can ohly be attached to the DRebel 300D & 350D and the 20D. The 10D can't take it, nore can the film bodies or the 1D family of cameras.

This may be what the nay-sayers are refering to.

I don't know about the Nikon lenses. Do they have a lens "made" for the smaller sensors? Do they fit on the D2x or film bodies?

Eric
eric s is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 30, 2005, 11:44 AM   #12
Moderator
 
Nagasaki's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 897
Default

The Nikon DX lenses are made for the smaller sensor. They do fit and work on the D2X which uses the smaller sensor size. They do fit and work on film cameras but create a circular image in the centre of the frame with black corners.



To be strictly accurate I did try the 12-24 DX lens on a Nikon F60 camera and at the 24mm end it worked OK the vignetting only occurred at the wider end of the zoom.
Nagasaki is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 30, 2005, 4:52 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 5,803
Default

Thanks for that info, I forgot that the D2x has a 1.5x crop factor. I've been living in the Canon world for so long I've stopped watching the Nikon bodies as closely as I used too.

Interesting that there is no vignetting at one end. I wouldn't have guessed that.

Eric
eric s is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 1, 2006, 8:29 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
airshowfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 115
Default

I recently had the opportunity to fit my "made for digital" Sigma 18-200 on my sister's old Rebel. The black circle was clearly visible at wide angle, but when you zoom in, it goes out of focus. Therefore the image at 100mm and bove has darker corners but is still kinda acceptable if you don't mind the darker corners or if you're willing to fix them. However, at wider angles the blackness in the corners is bad enough the lens isn't really useable.

I have a 10D, which has an EF mount, so I can't use Canon's EF-S wide-angle lenses. However, the third-party wide-angle lenses (like this Sigma and the Tamron I had before it) use the EF mount and can go on my 10D... but this means they can go by mistake on a film SLR like my sister's.

It's interesting to note that, on Sigma's site, it says some lensesshould only be used with APS-sensor-sized SLRs, some lenses are perfectly ok for full-frame use as well, and THEN (here's where it gets weird) some lenses are "Optimized for Digital SLRs" even though theyCAN be used for full-frame photography... I wonder if this is just a marketing thing (calling it a "digital SLR lens" even though it could be used on a full-frame SLR), or if it means "the edges are not that sharp because we wanted to make this lens cheap and we did it in a way digital SLR users won't mind"...
airshowfan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 1, 2006, 8:35 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
airshowfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 115
Default

Ah, and JohnG's theory that full-frame SLRs might become so common as to drive APS-sensor SLRs out of the market... It totally could happen. Remember that APS film was going to be the next big thing, then digital came along and now APS equipment is not too easy to find. (Heck, APS-film SLRs were available at one point). So it's perfectly possible that the APS-sensor dSLR will only be the most common option for a few years. Sure, a lot of people who got into SLR photography in the last few years (like me) now have some APS-only lenses (like my Sigma), so the market for APS-sensor stuff won't disappear overnight. If the big manufacturers come out with $1000 full-frame SLRs, it will still take years until a lot of people buy them and the manufacturers feel they want to ignore the few users who need the reduced-sensor stuff. (Personally, I hope the reduced-sensor dSLRs stay as the norm, since that 1.6x magnification really comes in handy in the kind of photography I do... I don't want to trade my 100-400 for a 600mm lens! Those things are expensive!)
airshowfan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 1, 2006, 11:03 PM   #16
Super Moderator
 
peripatetic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 3,599
Default

Sigma have changed their whole lens line up to be "optimised for digital".

They have two types of digital lenses though: DG and DC. One of the problems that digital sensors can have is that they can reflect light back onto the lens and that can cause nasty flare.

All the "digitally optimised" Sigma lenses have new coatings and sometimes even new elements to prevent this.

DG lenses cast a full-frame image and DC lenses cast a smaller image only useful for cameras with APS-C sized sensors.

If you are using a Canon 1D or 5D for example you would still gain the benefit of the DG optimisations, but should not use the DC lenses to avoid the vignetting.
peripatetic is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 2:30 AM.