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Old Dec 31, 2005, 5:58 AM   #1
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I finally got a fuji f10 after much research. However I have questions about how to set it for low light shots without the flash. Everytime I turn off the flash and increase the iso the little hand and exclamation point show up. This is warning of potential blurring due to no flash. I haved noticed if i don't hold the camera perfectly still I have had some blurred shots. Help.
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Old Dec 31, 2005, 6:54 AM   #2
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Just because the F10 goes to ISO 1600, doesn't mean that you won't get any blur from camera shake (depending on the lighting). ;-)

You'll still need to hold the camera steady and try not to cause any extra movement when squeezing the shutter button (think smooth).

The rule of thumb for hand held photos is that shutter speeds should be 1/focal length or faster to help reduce blur from camera shake.

So, if you're at a 50mm focal length, you'd want shutter speeds 1/50 second or faster. If you're at 100mm focal length, you'd want shutter speeds 1/100 second or faster. This is because camera shake is magnified as more optical zoom is used.

Note that 1/focal lengh or faster shutter speeds is only a rule of thumb. Some people may be able to hold a camera at much slower shutter speeds, and some people may need even faster shutter speeds to reduce blur.

With your model, you also lose light as more zoom is used (more than twice as much light reaches the sensor at your widest zoom setting versus your longest zoom setting). As a result, the camera must use slower shutter speedsfor any given lighting condition if you use more optical zoom.

So, in most indoor conditions, you'll want to stay at the wide angle end of the zoom range, and try to keep the camera as steady as possible to reduce blur.

In some lighting conditions, despite your best efforts to hold a camera steady, you may still need a tripod or flash.

Also, depending on lighting, even if you use a tripod, you may still get blur if your subject is not stationary (from subject movement versus camera shake).

Use an editor to see what your shutter speeds are in a given lighting condition, to get a better idea of what is happening when you see blur.

If you don't have one that can see this information when viewing an image, download Irfanview from http://www.irfanview.com (it's free). You'll see the camera settings for a photo under Image, Information, EXIF.

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Old Dec 31, 2005, 9:01 AM   #3
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Are you shooting in the AUTO mode, or the NATURAL LIGHT mode? I believe that if you use the AUTO mode, you don't get the entire ISO range. If you have to "turn the flash off", you're not in the NATURAL LIGHT mode.

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Old Dec 31, 2005, 12:40 PM   #4
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You can adjust the iso in the manual and auto modes. These are also the only modes that allow you to turn off the flash. In the sp (scene position) mode which has the natural light option the iso and flash are automatic.
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Old Dec 31, 2005, 4:42 PM   #5
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I was under the impression that the flash was not available when using the NATURAL LIGHT mode, therefore if you were manually shutting the flash off, you must be in an automatic mode. Just out of curiosity, at what ISO were you getting the blurry pics? Can you post a couple of the pics?

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Old Jan 1, 2006, 6:39 AM   #6
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You are correct. The flash is automatically turned of in the natural mode, and the iso is automatic in that mode. After having played with the camera a little more, it always shows the shake /blur warning if the light is low and you have the flash off. I think I just have to be steady when taking these shots. I guess one of the things I kept seeing about the f10 was its ability for low light shots without a flash. I think part of my problem now having tried the camera is the size of it. It is actually pretty small. Maybe I would be better with a bigger camera like the a610. I'll try and post pics tomorrow. Thanks
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Old Jan 1, 2006, 8:15 PM   #7
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How you hold your camera can be a big factor in reducing blur:

http://www.airshowfan.com/guide-to-d...3.htm#lowlight

Bend your elbows in against your chest, use the viewfinder instead of the LCD screen, and press the shutter button slowly. Keep your fingers from squeezing the camera too strongly - hold it gently. And press it against your face some for further stabilization. Those are my tricks to go quite a bit slower than the "1/focal length" rule of thumb - I just ignore the shaky-hand icon...
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Old Jan 2, 2006, 1:12 AM   #8
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Quote:
use the viewfinder instead of the LCD screen
I think he has a Fuji F10 unless I missed something.

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Old Jan 2, 2006, 9:30 AM   #9
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Yes , it is a fuji f10 which does not have a viewfinder. But thanks for the info anyway.
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Old Jan 7, 2006, 11:03 PM   #10
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When I use my F10 for indoor shots, I generally do not use the natural light mode, as it makes the pictures to red or yellow in certain lightings. I keep the camera on M and choose the ISO myself. However, in standard room lighting, a 1/20 to 1/40th of a second shutter speeds are still needed.

I have found that in some situations the slow-synchro flash produces very nice results. It can get rid of some strange shadows if your lighting isn't optimal without whiting everything out and creating harsh spots.

However, whether you use slow synchro or high ISO no flash, you need to hold the camera relatively still for optimal results. In low lighting, you won't be able to do one handed shots with no flash and high ISO. The best way I found to hold the camera is my right hand on the right side with my index finger on the shutter and my thumb on the battery compartment. My left hand is positioned on the left side with my thumb on the bottom of the camera, and my middle finder on top of the camera with my my non index finers curled to not block the cameras sensor. When you press the shutter, prefocus half way, then smoothly press the shutter afterwards.
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