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Old Jan 20, 2006, 10:36 AM   #1
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Hi, I'm new to this hobby and really enjoy reading everyone's tips so here is another question for anyone willing to help. I used to have a Kodak Z700 and quickly realized that it wouldn't sufice so I have recently upgraded to a Canon S2 IS, however one particular problem still plagues me. When I take close-ups of anything white the image usually turns into an unrecognizable white blob. Sometimes it is fine without the flash but only if there is enough external lighting. I am still learning how to use the aperature and shutter speeds to my advantage so any help would be appreciated.
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Old Jan 20, 2006, 10:54 AM   #2
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Shutter speeds don't really affect flash exposure as the flash is so brief it's shorter than the fastest shutter speeds.

The camera should measure the amount of light needed and shut off the flash when thetre is sufficient light for the exposure. The type of burnt out shot you're describing usually happens when the burst of light needed is shorter than the flash is capable of delivering. In these circumstances a smaller aperture can help. Just remember that the bigger the F number the smaller the aperture.
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Old Jan 20, 2006, 11:07 AM   #3
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I would just add that slower ISO will also help, and generally will give the best image if it has enough light. Your noise will usually be lowest for the lowest ISO that you can use for the given lighting.
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Old Jan 20, 2006, 11:10 AM   #4
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When you say "close-ups" how close do you mean?
One of the problem of close up work is that the depth of field is really small. Is it that your subjects are not properly exposed or are they out of focus?

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Old Jan 20, 2006, 11:33 AM   #5
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I would say that they aren't exposed correctly. The distance is typically 6" to 1'. Say I was taking the picture of a white book cover; it seems like there is almost a bright white reflection from the flash. Sometimes part of the image is okay and the letters on the cover would be perfectly focused. If I don't use the flash the image is too dark.

If I had an example image I would post it.
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Old Jan 20, 2006, 11:43 AM   #6
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rollsroyce76 wrote:
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I would say that they aren't exposed correctly. The distance is typically 6" to 1'
A quick glance at the camera's specs shows that you're too close for the flash (minimum working distance is 1 foot in Macro Mode, or 2.3 feet if you're not using Macro mode.

Normal: 2.3-17.1 ft./0.7-5.2m (W), 2.3-13.1 ft./0.7-4.0m (T)
Macro: 1.0 ft.-2.3 ft./0.3-0.7m
(When sensitivity is set to ISO 100 equivalent.)

You could try to use a diffuser of some kind. Try a tranlucent film container if you're got one handy, and see if it fits over the camera's flash.


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Old Feb 1, 2006, 4:24 PM   #7
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Just turn off the flash when you're inside, keep the lens around 8" from the subject, and use a tripod when necessary.
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