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Old Mar 25, 2003, 10:23 AM   #1
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Default Please criticize my pics

Hi all!

I am a complete newbie at digital photography. Below is a link where I have uploaded my first pics taken with a Minolta Dimage 7i. Please criticize them!

http://community.webshots.com/album/67540302WSIfiw

I am open to any suggestions that would help me improve my pictures. Also, if you know of any URL and/or books for absolute beginners please tell me about them.

I am especially interested in taking pictures of nature, both landscapes and close-up of flowers, butterflies and birds (I have a had a though time trying to get pics of these last two :? ).

Thanks in advance,

Rualina
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Old Mar 25, 2003, 12:18 PM   #2
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First pic is over exposed and needs adjusting with levels or hitogram functions. Good use of reflection.

2nd pic rather boring with nothing of real interest but technically ok.

3rd - the flower is far too small, zoom in or get closer.

4th - utterly boring with nothing of interest. Picture cut in half, look-up the rule of thirds.

5th - the building is over exposed and glaringly bright. Try bracketing with difficult situations like this or spot expose on the white. Some adjustment in levels might help.
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Old Mar 25, 2003, 12:32 PM   #3
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Default Thanks!

Hi Steve,

Thanks a lot for your comments and advice! I really appreciate them!

Right now I am reading about the Rule of Thirds


Rualina
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Old Mar 25, 2003, 10:13 PM   #4
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As for web sites where you can learn stuff, here are a few links that I've collected:

http://www.betterphoto.com/home.asp

Specifically look in the "articles" link on the left. There is a *huge* wealth of info at this site.

http://www.shortcourses.com/.

Lots of good stuff here. I find the other one easier to find exactly what I'm trying to learn about.... but this one is well written and gives good example pictures along with the text.

http://www3.photosig.com/
http://www.photocritique.net/

Places you can post your pictures and get a critique of them. I've never used either, but I found them in my wonderings and save links to them.

Eric
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Old Mar 26, 2003, 11:37 AM   #5
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A well-qualified speaker at a camera club once told me the TRUE meaning of A.R.P.S. (generally believed to stand for "Associate of the Royal Photographic Society")

Being entitled to use these letters after his name, he felt qualified to state that they really define something that every good colour photograph needs.

Anyone care to hazard a guess? A clue - 2 of your pics have it and 3 don't... :lol:

fenlander
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Old Mar 26, 2003, 12:07 PM   #6
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Come-on the suspense is killing me!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

OK, the first two have it but I don't know what IT is - they just look better.
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Old Mar 26, 2003, 6:52 PM   #7
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Default Some more pics...problem with sunrise pic

Hi all!

Thank you Eric for all the links and info.

Fenlander I am curious too! Which are the 2 pics?

I have uploaded a few more pics. When you have the time please take a look.

Today I tried to get a picture of the sunrise, but the colors turned out to be too dark. :?

What are the ideal settings for taking pics of sunrises? :?:

Bye for now
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Old Mar 26, 2003, 7:09 PM   #8
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Hi,

Problems with sundowns and risings is the way your eye sees it, and your camera, best is to use a 50% graycard and make your white reference on that, lock this and take the pictures with that.
Take a setting like landscape for good DOF.

I'm a beginner but reading alot lately, this forum helps alot. Let's hope I can share more in future.

Greetings,
Frank
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Old Mar 28, 2003, 12:49 AM   #9
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Rualina

Glad to help. I've learned a lot from here, so I try to return the favor.

Since you were at that sunrize, you know how the picture doesn't match reality. I just look at the picture and think two things.

1) I wish I was there.

2) I wish the picture had more detail. That light house looks kinda soft on the edges.

fenlander

Get back here and tell is what you're getting at!!!!
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Old Mar 28, 2003, 3:40 AM   #10
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OK. I just went off to do a day's work...

The ARPS key to striking photos? - A Red Patch Somewhere.

Not quite as daft as it sounds. In the days of transparencies, red gave a picture a 3D quality because the colour stands out from blues and greens.

Rualina: there are some well-seen pics here, but there are a number of technical and compositional problems that you'll learn to avoid as you get more experienced with your camera.

Let's say little about "Mar" - good thing it wasn't on film as that costs money. One or two make you ask "What's this a picture OF?" - despite the red patch. "flor" comes into this category; so do "iglesia" and "bromelia". Is that a plant or a couple of large poles? The camera is much less selective than your eye: you didn't actually SEE those poles because you were interested in the plant, but the camera saw them.

The pictures of the children are much more interesting: I particularly like "Diegoynat".

Now, do you do any post-processing? It's what makes digital photography so much more interesting than working with film. Looking at some of your pics in Paint Shop Pro, a number of things show up. Some of the pics have compressed histograms. Here's "iglesia":



Notice the empty area on the left of the chart. This indicates that the tonal range of the picture excludes an area of darker colour. When this is the case, blacks appear grey and colours lack depth. It's usually caused by wrong exposure, but it can be easily adjusted by moving the sliders below the histogram:



Here's the difference (with a bit of cropping as well):



Cropping is usually the best thing you can do to a picture. "Dieguito" is a nice pic, but it has a distinct blue colour cast and far too much wall (what's it a picture OF - the child or the wall?).
A quick crop and colour balance gives this:



Keep up the good work. If you haven't already got some photo-editing software, take a look at Paint Shop Pro or Photoshop Elements and start turning your snaps into much better pictures.

fenlander
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