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Old Mar 30, 2006, 12:46 AM   #1
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Hello!

I just bought my first digital SLR (Nikon D50) and am extremely excited about it! The package I purchased includes the camera body, along with 2 lenses (both Nikon, one is 28-80mm zoom and the other 70-300mm zoom). Ultimately, I hope to purchase a good macro lens (my main interest is nature photography and I likeextreme closeups of plants, fungus,and whatnot). I've been ogling the Sigma and Nikon 105mm macro lenses, but it will be a while before I can afford either one...have also been looking into the 60mm macros.

In the meantime, a good friend of mine has mentioned that he'd be happy to lend me his Sigma 60mm macro lens (he's got the 105mm now and does not like the 60mm lens). The problem is: he uses the Canon 20D (or something like that; forgive me if I've botched the name), so his lenses have Canon mounts.

Is there some sort of conversion device available to make a Canon lens mount work with the Nikon D50?

Thank you in advance for any advice you have for me!


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Old Mar 30, 2006, 2:03 AM   #2
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In general: No you can't. The lens mount are different.

But using Nikon lens on Canon maybe possible, read it below. I don't know if this is true for digital SLRs, it may be just 35mm film SLRs, but here's where I read it from:

http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/nikcan.htm


I wouldn't do it though, at least not for a $200 adapter.

http://www.adorama.com/NVEOSNK.html

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Old Mar 30, 2006, 9:18 AM   #3
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I see. You're right--$200 and the hassle just wouldn't be worth it! And it doesn't mention anything about using Canonlenseson a Nikon body, so perhaps it's simply impossible.

Oh well--I'll probably be plenty busy figuring out all the little details on the D50 for a while, so perhaps I shouldn't be in such a hurry to get the macro anyway.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"Thank you!
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Old Mar 30, 2006, 9:59 AM   #4
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Since you like macro work, I thought I'd add this idea.

Get some extention tubes. The Kenko tubes are supposed to be good and they will be cheaper than the Nikon tubes.

What they do is reduce the minimum focusing distance. In other words, they get you closer to your subject at the cost of a little bit of light (you'll loose around 1/5th to 1/3 of a stop of light. Not too much, especially for the cheapness of the solution.

They go between your lens and the camera body thereby moving the lens further away from the focusing plane (the sensor.) This causes the region where the lens can focus (from some close location to near infinity) closer to you. So you loose infinity focus, but gain a closer focus.

Here is a set that will work on your camera.
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...ughType=search

Are they "Cheap"? No. But they are much cheaper than a macro lens.
Are they as good as a macro lens? No, macro lenses are traditionall some of the sharpest lenses made, and they have larger min apertures (larger f-stop.) But they *do* work and you *can* do good stuff with them.

They are also small and light. I have a set that I keep in my bag all the time. They take up little space and are useful when you find you need them (like when a butterfly lands near by.)

Eric
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Old Apr 2, 2006, 9:54 PM   #5
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An alternative to extension tubes is an ad on lens like the canon 500D. Unlike the single element close up lens, it is dual element and will give much better results.

http://www.camerahobby.com/Access-Canon500D.htm
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Old Apr 3, 2006, 11:58 AM   #6
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Good point. I've used the 500D and it does work. I found it a bit hard to use at first, but adjusted to it.

Personally, I prefer using extention tubes on my 100-400 (not a cheap lens!) but the 500D did work (I borrowed it for a few hours at a butterfly house.)

Eric
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